South Korea

After World War II, a democratic-based government (Republic of Korea, ROK) was set up in the southern half of the Korean Peninsula while a communist-style government was installed in the north (Democratic People's Republic of Korea, DPRK). During the Korean War (1950-53), US troops and UN forces fought alongside ROK soldiers to defend South Korea from a DPRK invasion supported by China and the Soviet Union. A 1953 armistice split the peninsula along a demilitarized zone at about the 38th parallel. PARK Chung-hee took over leadership of the country in a 1961 coup. During his regime South Korea achieved rapid economic growth. South Korea held its first free presidential election in 1987, with former ROK Army general ROH Tae-woo winning a close race. In 1993, KIM Young-sam (1993-98) became South Korea's first civilian president. LEE Myung-bak (2008-2013) pursued a policy of global engagement, highlighted by Seoul's hosting of the G-20 summit in November 2010 and the Nuclear Security Summit in March 2012. South Korea also secured a non-permanent seat (2013-14) on the UN Security Council and will host the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. President PARK Geun-hye took office in February 2013 and is South Korea's first female leader. Serious tensions with North Korea have punctuated inter-Korean relations in recent years, including the North's sinking of the South Korean warship Cheonan in March 2010 and its artillery attack on South Korean soldiers and citizens in November 2010.

Maximizing the Role of U.S.-South Korea-Japan Trilateral Coordination in a Time of Austerity

Wed, 07/17/2013 - 15:00
Wed, 07/17/2013 - 16:30

On Wednesday, July 17, 2013 the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) hosted an important public diplomacy component of USIP's ongoing U.S.-South Korea-Japan Track 1.5 project called "Trilateral Dialogue in Northeast Asia" (TDNA)

Launched in the spring of 2008, the TDNA is a Track 1.5 project involving government and think tank participants from the United States, the Republic of Korea, and Japan. The organizing partners included USIP, the Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS) of South Korea, and the Institute for International Policy Studies (IIPS) of Japan. TDNA seeks to foster the development of policy proposals through recurring Track 1.5 dialogue on common challenges and opportunities in Northeast Asia and in the international community.

Type of Event or Course: 

Maral Noori

Maral
Noori
Program Assistant, Asia-Pacific Program

Maral Noori is a program assistant in the Asia-Pacific Program at the U.S. Institute of Peace. She works on North East Asia, the East and South China Seas, as well as Myanmar. She supports the Institute’s ongoing Track 1.5 Dialogues with partners in China, Japan, and South Korea; the Korea Working Group; the Naval Attaché Roundtable Meetings; and various additional activities and projects. Noori joined the Asia Pacific Program in October 2013.

Lieutenant Colonel Curtis Carlin

Curtis
Carlin
Commandant of the Marine Corps Fellow

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Lieutenant Colonel Carlin was commissioned in 1993 from the University of Florida. During his Fleet Marine Force tour with 3rd Marine Division in Okinawa, Japan, he was a communication platoon commander, company commander and S6 officer. After graduating from resident Command and Control Systems Course, he completed a tour with Marine Corps Combat Development Command and then served with 1st Marine Aircraft Wing as Deputy G6, Staff Secretary and operations officer for the communication squadron.

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USIP Hosts Round of Northeast Asia Track 1.5 Dialogue

The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) this week hosted the eighth round of the Trilateral Dialogue in Northeast Asia, a Track 1.5 project involving current and former senior policymakers and military officials from the United States, South Korea and Japan. The discussions delved into a variety of security and diplomatic topics, including historical tensions between South Korea and Japan, and “achieved candor in a relaxed and truly non-defensive environment,” said one of the participants, Stephen Hadley, USIP’s senior advisor for international affairs and a former U.S. national security advisor.

Hadley spoke at a public forum on July 17 capping this week’s trilateral sessions. He said part of the conversations focused on “the elephant in the room”—tensions between South Korea and Japan rooted in a tangled and sensitive history of relations that can make coordination on security strategy between them and their U.S. ally more difficult.

Fri, 07/19/2013 - 08:59
Type of Article: 

John S. Park

John
Park
Senior Asia Advisor, Center for Conflict Management

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

John S. Park is senior Asia adviser at USIP, where he directs Northeast Asia track 1.5 projects. These include the U.S.-China Project on Crisis Avoidance and Cooperation, the U.S.-South Korea-Japan Trilateral Dialogue in Northeast Asia, the U.S.-China-Japan Dialogue on Risk Reduction and Crisis Prevention, and the Korea Working Group. Park advises Northeast Asia policy-focused officials at the Departments of State, Defense, and the Treasury; on the National Security Council; and on Congressional committees. 

Role: 

Democratic Breakthroughs: The Ingredients of Successful Revolts

Although each revolution is different, each successful case of democratic breakthrough shares common domestic and international influences. This report examines 11 cases of past successes at removing autocratic regimes and establishing elections. It then applies its findings to the emerging revolutions of the Arab Spring.

Ray Salvatore Jennings

Summary

  • The cases of successful breakthrough examined in this study are the Soviet Union in 1991 and Russia in 1993, Poland in 1989, Serbia in 2000, Ukraine in 2004, Indonesia by 1999, Chile in 1988, and South Africa by 1996. Cases of failed and then ultimately successful democratic transition are Ghana by 2000, Mexico by 2000, South Korea by 1987, and Turkey by 1983. Finally, the cases of failed transition examined are Algeria in 1991, Iran in 1979, China in 1989, and Azerbaijan in 2005.
Fri, 07/27/2012 - 10:03
Type of Article: 

USIP's Korea Working Group Convenes 5th U.S.-South Korean Track 1.5 Dialogue

On March 28, USIP's Korea Working Group (KWG), headed by John Park, convened the 5th USIP-Korea Institute for National Unification (KINU) Washington Workshop titled "The Outlook for the North Korean Situation and Prospects for U.S.-ROK Cooperation After the Death of Kim Jong-il.".

April 20, 2012

John Park
Fri, 04/20/2012 - 14:48
Type of Article: 

Truth Commission: South Korea 2005

Truth Commission: South Korea
Truth Commission: Truth and Reconciliation Commission
Duration: December 2005-December 2010 (five years)
Charter: Law No. 7542 (May 31, 2005)
Commissioners: 14 male, 1 female
Report: Public report

Truth Commission: Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Committee on Clearing Up Part Incidents for Truth and Reconciliation, 진실화해를위한과거사정리위원회)

Dates of Operation: The Commission started operations in December 2005 and closed its activities on December 31, 2010.

Wed, 04/18/2012 - 15:09
Issue Areas: 
Type of Article: 
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Briefing on the Seoul Nuclear Security Summit

On March 12, the U.S. Institute of Peace’s (USIP) Center for Conflict Management and the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs co-convened a closed briefing on the Seoul Nuclear Security Summit for senior diplomats of countries whose head of state will be participating in the summit. Ambassadors, Deputy Chiefs of Mission, and Heads of Political Section from over 30 embassies participated in the briefing.

March 15, 2012

Thu, 03/15/2012 - 14:34
Type of Article: 

Truth Commission Digital Collection

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management.  The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management

The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

Wed, 03/16/2011 - 16:14
Type of Article: 

Articles & Analysis

July 19, 2013

The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) this week hosted the eighth round of the Trilateral Dialogue in Northeast Asia, a Track 1.5 project involving current and former senior policymakers and military officials from the United States, South Korea and Japan. The discussions delved into a variety of security and diplomatic topics, including historical tensions between South Korea and Japan, and “achieved candor in a relaxed and truly non-defensive environment,” said one of the participants, Stephen Hadley, USIP’s senior advisor for international affairs and a former U.S....

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The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) this week hosted the eighth round of the Trilateral Dialogue in Northeast Asia, a Track 1.5 project involving current and former senior policymakers and military officials from the United States, South Korea and Japan. The discussions delved into a variety of security and diplomatic topics, including historical tensions between South Korea and Japan, and “achieved candor in a relaxed and truly non-defensive environment,” said one of the participants, Stephen Hadley, USIP’s senior advisor for international affairs and a former U.S. national security advisor.
By:
Ray Salvatore Jennings
Although each revolution is different, each successful case of democratic breakthrough shares common domestic and international influences. This report examines 11 cases of past successes at removing autocratic regimes and establishing elections. It then applies its findings to the emerging revolutions of the Arab Spring.