Philippines

A 20-year rule by Ferdinand Marcos ended in 1986, when a "people power" movement in Manila ("EDSA 1") forced him into exile and installed Corazon Aquino as president. Fidel Ramos was elected president in 1992. His administration was marked by increased stability and by progress on economic reforms. Joseph Estrada was elected president in 1998. He was succeeded by his vice-president, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, in January 2001 after Estrada's impeachment trial on corruption charges broke down and another "people power" movement ("EDSA 2") demanded his resignation. Benigno Aquino III was elected to a six-year term as president in May 2010. Manila has waged a decades-long struggle against ethnic Moro insurgencies in the southern Philippines, which has led to a peace accord with the Moro National Liberation Front and ongoing peace talks with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. The decades-long Maoist-inspired New People's Army insurgency also operates through much of the country. The Philippines faces increased tension with China over disputed territorial and maritime claims in the South China Sea.

Navigating the Rise of Sunni-Shia Violent Sectarianism

A recent PEW Research Center report examined polls conducted between November 2011 and May 2012. It found that 52 percent of Muslims polled in Iraq, 44 percent in Afghanistan and 67 percent in Lebanon said Sunni-Shia tensions are a “very big or moderately big” problem in their country. The re-escalation of violence in Iraq this year likely would have increased the concern there if the polling were conducted today.

Working Effectively with Interpreters

Wed, 12/11/2013 (All day)
Wed, 12/31/2014 - 23:59

This course is designed for international professionals who wish to improve their communication skills when working with an interpreter in a cross-cultural context.

The success of a project or mission in a cross-cultural, multilingual environment often depends upon effective communication with an audience or local counterpart. Interpreters play a critical role in bridging language and cultural divides, but that depends upon your ability to work with them effectively. Failed interpretation of an important message or concept can easily lead to miscommunication, embarrassment, strained relationships, or even danger. This course offers practical tips to work effectively with interpreters.

Type of Event or Course: 

A Diplomatic Milestone for Mindanao?

Dr. Jennifer M. Keister, a former USIP Randolph-Jennings Peace Scholar, bases this report on her own research—during which she has spent more than 21 months in the field, traveling extensively in conflict-affected areas of Mindanao (2008-2011)—and on recent discussions with contacts still in-country.

Jennifer M. Keister

Summary

  • A recent framework agreement between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) leaves much yet to do in building peace in Mindanao, but does offer an opportunity for careful progress.
  • Many of the problems that have plagued previous agreements in Mindanao’s 40-year conflict still exist.
  • The international community has an opportunity to support progress and avoid a repeat of previous agreements’ disappointments.
Mon, 12/03/2012 - 15:54
Type of Article: 
Countries: 

Religion and Peacebuilding

The maturing field of religious peacebuilding faces challenges in integrating with secular peacebuilding efforts, engaging women and youth, and working more effectively with non-Abrahamic religious traditions.

Summary

  • The field of religious peacebuilding has begun to move closer to the mainstream of conflict resolution practice and theory. The 2011 unrest in the Middle East and North Africa—the Arab Spring—reflects ongoing challenges and opportunities for the field.
Susan Hayward
Fri, 08/03/2012 - 17:01
Type of Article: 

Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping: An Emerging Approach to Civilian Protection and Violence Prevention

Wed, 03/21/2012 - 10:00
Wed, 03/21/2012 - 11:30
Public Event

Nonviolent Peaceforce (NP) and Peace Brigades International (PBI), two of the leaders in unarmed civilian protection, will present how peacekeeping works without guns, what lessons are being learned, and how this practice can now be brought to scale.

 

U.S. Institute of Peace
2301 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20037

Inquiries

If you have any questions about this event, please contact Renata Stuebner at rstuebner@usip.org 

From South Sudan to Sri Lanka, Guatemala to Nepal, specially trained, unarmed civilians are protecting civilians under threat and preventing violence from escalating in areas of violent conflict. Working on the basis of strict nonpartisanship and at the invitation of local civil society, these peacekeepers apply field-tested strategies that create space for local actors to transform conflicts, protect human rights defenders and others made vulnerable by the conflict, as well as supporting local violence prevention mechanisms.

Experts: 
Type of Event or Course: 

"Rewiring Regional Security" Released at USIP Gathering

Security experts gathered at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) on Dec. 1 to address the question of who—amid rapid global change--has the responsibility, will and capacity to provide security in a variety of conflicts and problems around the world. The event marked the release of Rewiring Regional Security in a Fragmented World, a 20-chapter volume drawing on contributions from numerous security specialists.

Security experts gathered at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) on Dec. 1 to address the question of who—amid rapid global change--has the responsibility, will and capacity to provide security in a variety of conflicts and problems around the world.
Thomas Omestad
Fri, 12/02/2011 - 17:31
Type of Article: 
Countries: 

Eye on USIP's Religion and Peacemaking Center

Religion is often seen as the cause of strife around the globe, but in reality, it can provide the foundation for what helps to end conflict. USIP’s work, from Indonesia to Pakistan, demonstrates that religion can play a positive role in managing conflict. USIP’s David Smock, senior vice president for the Centers of Innovation, explores the issue in this brief question-and-answer.

Religion is often seen as the cause of strife around the globe, but in reality, it can provide the foundation for what helps to end conflict. USIP’s work, from Indonesia to Pakistan, demonstrates that religion can play a positive role in managing conflict.

Thu, 11/10/2011 - 15:56
Type of Article: 

Peace Negotiations in the Philippines: The Government, the MILF and International NGOs

In many peace negotiations International Contact Groups have been a helpful tool in preventing a peace process from stalling or failing. Members, commonly states and international organizations, exert leverage on the parties to the conflict, sustain the parties’ commitment to a peaceful resolution of the conflict and restore mutual trust.

Claudia Hofmann

Summary

  • In many peace negotiations International Contact Groups have been a helpful tool in preventing a peace process from stalling or failing. Members, commonly states and international organizations, exert leverage on the parties to the conflict, sustain the parties’ commitment to a peaceful resolution of the conflict and restore mutual trust.
Tue, 05/03/2011 - 19:46
Type of Article: 
Countries: 

International Islamic Peace Education Workshop held in Davao City, Philippines

Qamar-ul Huda discusses the International Islamic Peace Education Workshop organized by the U.S. Institute of Peace in partnership with the Philippine Center for Islam and Democracy (PCID) and Magbassa Kita Foundation Inc (MKFI).

Qamar-ul Huda

From June 27- July 1, 2010, a group of thirty-five Muslim educators from eight countries came to Mindanao, the second largest island in the Philippines, for an international Particpants at International Workshop on Islamic Eduationworkshop on Islamic Peace Education. The workshop was organized by the Philippine Center for Islam and Democracy (PCID) , Magbassa Kita Foundation  Inc (MKFI), and the United States Institute of Peace (USIP).

Fri, 07/16/2010 - 12:21
Type of Article: 

The Monopoly of Force: The Nexus between DDR and SSR

Fri, 03/05/2010 - 09:00
Fri, 03/05/2010 - 16:00

Both DDR and SSR address the heart of the relationship between a state and its people: political control of armed force. What are the connections between DDR and SSR, and how can these be implemented?

Please note the location: 

George C. Marshall Hall, Room 155
National Defense University
Fort Lesley J. McNair
300 5th Avenue SW
Washington, D.C.


 

Please contact us with any questions about this event or your registration.

8:30 – 9:00 Registration and Coffee

9:00 – 9:15 Introduction and Welcome

  • Vice Admiral Ann E. Rondeau, United States Navy
    President of the National Defense University and
    Member Ex-Officio, Board of Directors, U.S. Institute of Peace

9:15 – 10:00 Opening Keynote

  • General James Mattis, United States Marine Corps
    Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM)

10:00 – 11:00 The Nexus Between DDR and SSR

  • Sean McFate, Relationship between SSR and DDR
    Assistant Professor, National Defense University, College of International Security Affairs (CISA)
  • Ayaka Suzuki, U.N. DPKO Guidance on DDR and SSR
    Chief, DDR Section, United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations (U.N. DPKO)
  • Michelle Hughes, Esq., Relationship between SSR and DDR
    Principal Director, Rule of Law General Dynamics - Information Technology, USJFCOM
  • Daniel Serwer, Moderator
    Vice President, Centers of Innovation, U.S. Institute of Peace

11:15 – 12:30 DDR and SSR: Case Studies

  • Mark Sedra, Afghanistan
    Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)
  • Adriaan Verheul, Sudan
    former Chief of the Integrated United Nations DDR Unit in the United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS)
  • G. Eugene Martin, The Philippines
    Managing Director, Asia Pacific Strategies, and Adviser, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Lieutenant General David W. Barno, Moderator
    United States Army, Retired, Director, Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies

12:30 – 2:00 Lunch and Keynote Speaker

  • Ambassador Jacques Paul Klein,
    Undersecretary-General, United Nations (Retired)

2:00 – 3:30 Reintegration: The “Forgotten R”

  • Mark Knight, Rebel Military Integration and Civil War Termination
    Research and Analysis Officer, Peace Nexus
  • Jacqueline O'Neill, DDR, Gender and Child Soldiers
    Lead Advocacy Coordinator, Institute for Inclusive Security (IIS)
  • Judith Asuni, Consequences of the Forgotten R
    Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Michael Miklaucic, Justice, Reconciliation and Reintegration
    Director of Research and Editor of PRISM, Center for Complex Operations
  • Scott Moore, Moderator
    Deputy Director, Center for Complex Operations

3:30 – 4:00 Concluding Remarks

Event Summary

Type of Event or Course: 

Articles & Analysis

Sectarianism and extremist violence between Sunni and Shia Muslims have both increased to unexpected proportions since the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, the eruption of the Arab Spring, and the...

By:
Qamar-ul Huda

Religion is often seen as the cause of strife around the globe, but in reality, it can provide the foundation for what helps to end conflict. USIP’s work, from Indonesia to Pakistan, demonstrates...

By:

Security experts gathered at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) on Dec. 1 to...

By:
Thomas Omestad

Learn More

Publications

By:
Jennifer M. Keister
Dr. Jennifer M. Keister, a former USIP Randolph-Jennings Peace Scholar, bases this report on her own research—during which she has spent more than 21 months in the field, traveling extensively in...
The maturing field of religious peacebuilding faces challenges in integrating with secular peacebuilding efforts, engaging women and youth, and working more effectively with non-Abrahamic religious...