Pakistan

USIP has been involved on the ground in Pakistan, training Pakistanis in conflict resolution and negotiation skills, so that they are able to assist in disputes in their own communities. An important goal for USIP in Pakistan is to increase female participation in politics, civil society, and other aspects of civic life.

Pakistan: Economic and Stabilization Prospects

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 15:00
Tue, 04/08/2014 - 16:30
Subtitle: 
A discussion with Pakistan's Finance Minister, Honorable Mohammad Ishaq Dar

The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a discussion with Pakistan’s Finance Minister, Honorable Mohammad Ishaq Dar, on how the Pakistani government views the country’s present economic situation, the challenges it faces, and its efforts to course-correct since it took office in June 2013.

Experts: 

The Pakistani civilian government is closing in on its one-year mark in office. The government, known for its business and economy-friendly outlook, continues to deal with tough economic, development and energy challenges that have hindered fast-paced recovery. While economic growth forecasts project improvement, a number of key reforms in the tax structures, privatization, civil service and the like remain elusive.

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Development, Social Sector and Pakistan’s Long-term Stabilization Challenges

Tue, 03/25/2014 - 15:00
Tue, 03/25/2014 - 16:30

USAID Mission Director for Pakistan, Greg Gottlieb, spoke at USIP on the state of the Pakistani economy, and the link between development, the social sector and stabilization.

Experts: 

The Pakistani state continues to face difficult development challenges. Implementing a tighter fiscal policy to meet the conditions set under the IMF's $6.6 billion loan, the government of Pakistan has reduced its development budget. While the link between development and stabilization is often made, seldom do we expand the discussion of ‘development’ to the social sector. This arena tends to become the first casualty in tight fiscal environments with underappreciated repercussions for long-term stability of a country. Do we need a rethink on the social sector-stabilization link?

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Pakistan Media: Democratic Inclusion, Accountability and Peaceful Contestation

Thu, 01/23/2014 - 14:15
Thu, 01/23/2014 - 16:00

USIP held a panel discussion about a new policy briefing on Pakistan media by BBC Media Action.

  • 2:15pm to 2:25pm | Moeed Yusuf, USIP Director of South Asia and Sheldon Himelfarb, USIP Director of the PeaceTech Initiative, Opening Remarks
  • 2:25pm to 2:40pm | Huma Yusuf, Discussant, BBC Media Action consultant and co-author of “The media of Pakistan:  Fostering inclusion in a fragile democracy?”
  • 2:40pm to 2:55pm | Michael Dwyer, Discussant, USIP Senior Program Officer
  • 2:55pm to 3:10pm | Pamela Constable, Discussant, staff writer for the Washington Post and the author of "Playing with Fire: Pakistan at War with Itself"
  • 3:10pm to 4:00pm | Q&A Discussion

The challenges and opportunities facing Pakistan’s media in many ways reflect the challenges and opportunities facing the country’s democracy. After a decade of transformation, Pakistan’s media have become an increasingly coherent platform for raising popular concerns and needs. Yet, considerable constraints remain. Decades of state manipulation undermined the development of robust media organizations. Legal protections are weak, security threats are many and the industry is not financially sound.

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Getting it Right in Afghanistan

Thu, 01/16/2014 - 09:00
Thu, 01/16/2014 - 11:00
Subtitle: 
Prospects for 2014

The United States Institute of Peace hosted a panel discussion to launch its latest book, Getting it Right in Afghanistan, on what needs to be done in 2014 in Afghanistan. Panelists included Ghost Wars author Steve Coll, former Afghan Ambassador Omar Samad, and USIP’s Moeed Yusuf. The panel discussion was preceded by an introduction by Andrew Wilder, and a brief presentation of the book by Scott Smith..

The upcoming year will undoubtedly be challenging in Afghanistan with a crucial election next April that will lead to the country’s first democratic transfer of power. There is a prevailing climate of uncertainty relating to the drawdown of the international military and assistance presence, as well as over the signing of the Bilateral Security Agreement with the United States. Support for future assistance is dropping quickly in donor countries, especially in the United States.

  • Andrew Wilder, Introduction and Welcome
    Vice President, Center for South and Central Asia, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Scott Smith, Presentation of Getting it Right in Afghanistan
    Director, Afghanistan and Central Asia Program, U.S. Institute of Peace

Panel Discussion:

  • Steve Coll
    Dean, Columbia School of Journalism and author of Ghost Wars
  • Omar Samad
    Former Afghan Ambassador to Canada and France; Senior Central Asian Fellow, New America Foundation
  • Moeed Yusuf
    Director, South Asia Program, U.S. Institute of Peace
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Domestic Barriers to Dismantling the Militant Infrastructure in Pakistan

Mon, 11/04/2013 - 13:30
Mon, 11/04/2013 - 15:00

USIP hosted a discussion on November 4, 2013 on the nature of Islamist militancy that examined the barriers to dismantling the militant infrastructure in Pakistan.

Experts: 

Pakistan’s inability to tackle Islamist militancy within its borders and to prevent cross-border attacks from its soil remains a constant worry for the world. While the Pakistani state pledges lack of capacity to deal with the various facets of the militant challenge, the world is unconvinced of the ‘will’ of the Pakistani leadership to fight with determination. The Pakistani security establishment has been seen as selectively targeting certain Islamist outfits while ignoring, supporting, or abetting others.

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The Water-Security Nexus in Pakistan

Thu, 05/30/2013 - 10:00
Thu, 05/30/2013 - 11:30

The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a panel discussion on May 30, 2013 from 10:00 am until 11:30 am on USIP’s new PeaceWorks, “Understanding Pakistan’s Water-Security Nexus”, and the opportunities and pitfalls of peacebuilding through environmental policy in South Asia.

Experts: 

Because of overuse and misuse, Pakistan is headed toward a serious water crisis. The U.N. is expected to downgrade Pakistan from ‘water stressed’ to ‘water scarce’ by 2030. While issues between India and Pakistan often garner the most attention, water conflicts within Pakistan’s borders have the explosive potential to poison inter-ethnic and inter-provincial relations and turn simmering tension into violence.

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Pakistan's 2013 Elections: Assessing the Results and Impacts

Tue, 05/14/2013 - 14:00
Tue, 05/14/2013 - 15:30

Please join the U.S. Institute of Peace on May 14, 2013 from 2:00pm until 3:30pm, for a panel discussion on the results of Pakistan’s May 11th elections, and the implications of these results for both for Pakistan, as well as U.S.-Pakistan relations.

Pakistan’s general election scheduled for May 11th, 2013, will mark a further milestone in the country’s democratic development. While previous elected governments in Pakistan have completed their full terms in office, and political power has been peacefully transferred, expectations have been high that the 2013 elections would be the most free and fair ever in Pakistan’s history.

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Youth Bulge, Public Policy, and Prospects for Peace in Pakistan 

Wed, 10/10/2012 - 09:00
Wed, 10/10/2012 - 17:00
Public Event

The School of Public Policy at George Mason University (GMU) and the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) jointly organized a one-day conference that focused on the Pakistani youth, public policy options, and the prospects for peace in the long run.

8:30-9:00 Registration

9:00-9:15 Welcome Remarks

  • Dr. Abiodun Williams, Senior Vice President, USIP
  • Moeed Yusuf, South Asia Advisor, USIP

9:15-10:30 Session I: Pakistani Youth in National Development

  • Chaired by: Dr. Edward Rhodes, School of Public Policy, GMU
  • Dr. Mehtab S. Karim, School of Public Policy, GMU
  • Ms. Nasim Zehra, Dunya TV & Harvard University
  • Mr. Saleem Ranjha, Akhuwat Foundation, Lahore

10:30-11:45 Session II Opportunities for Youth in Pakistan

  • Chaired by: Dr. Eric Manes, The World Bank
  • Dr. Mohsin Khan, Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, Atlantic Council
  • Dr Philip Auerswald, School of Public Policy, George Mason University
  • Mr. Ammar Anees Malik, School of Public Policy, George Mason University

11:45-12:45 Keynote Luncheon Speaker

  • Dr. Asad Majid Khan, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, Washington, D.C.

12:45-2:15 Session III Views of Pakistani Diaspora

  • Chaired by: Dr. Andrew Wilder, US Institute of Peace
  • Mr. Ifran Malik, USPAK Foundation
  • Ms. Kalsoom Lakhani, Invest2Innovate
  • Ms. Shamila Chaudhary, Eurasia Group

2:15-2:30 Coffee Break

2:30-4:00 Session IV Role of Education in Achieving Peace in Pakistan

  • Chaired by: Dr. Peter Stearns, George Mason University
  • Mr. Moeed Yusuf, US Institute of Peace
  • Dr. M Nizamuddin, University of Gurjat, Pakistan
  • Dr. Jack Goldstone, School of Public Policy, George Mason University

Vote of Thanks: Dr. Mehtab Karim, George Mason University

Pakistan has been in the limelight since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. While there has been plenty of it, the debate and policy analyses on the country have focused on the immediate concerns linked to extremism and terrorism. Yet, questions about the long term economic, political, and social health remain just as critical and will ultimately determine whether Pakistan stabilizes as a medium sized, stable, and moderate country or presents itself as a ticking time bomb that is a constant source of worry for the world.

George Mason University

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Pakistan’s New Government Seeks Exit from Economic Malaise

Pakistan Finance Minister Mohammad Ishaq Dar wrapped up a round of road shows for international investors recently as the country returns to the bond markets after a multi-year hiatus. During an appearance at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) last week, he joked that he was still in sales mode as he gave an upbeat assessment of the government’s drive to strengthen the economy.

Exports are rising, annual economic growth is up, the budget deficit has dropped and leaders are focused on increasing investment and trade rather than depending on foreign aid, Dar told the audience at USIP on April 8.

Viola Gienger
Mon, 04/14/2014 - 14:09
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PakVotes: A Social Media Experiment in Elections Monitoring

PakVotes, an experimental project run by a Pakistani NGO and supported by USIP, brought social media platforms together with a network of reporters to track violence during Pakistan’s 2013 elections. The experience offers lessons for the future use of social media to publicize conflicts and violence during elections and other major events.

Summary

  • PakVotes, a pilot project supported by the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), used social media platforms and a network of reporters located in areas outside of major cities in Pakistan to track violence during the 2013 elections.
  • The project offers lessons that could guide future efforts to use social media to record and publicize conflicts and the use of violence during elections and other major events.
Mon, 04/14/2014 - 07:56
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Articles & Analysis

April 14, 2014

Pakistan Finance Minister Mohammad Ishaq Dar wrapped up a round of road shows for international investors recently as the country returns to the bond markets after a multi-year hiatus. During an appearance at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) last week, he joked that he was still in sales mode as he gave an upbeat assessment of the government’s drive to strengthen the economy.

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Instructor:
Bruce MacDonald, Michael Lekson

Examine the challenges and implications of Iran’s nuclear program and Pakistan’s expanding nuclear arsenal, in terms both of regional stability and the global nonproliferation regime. Increase your understanding of the role of nuclear weapons in international security challenges and of ways to manage the threats they pose.

Iran’s approaching nuclear weapons capability has been a source of increasing international anxiety and concern, while Pakistani nuclear actions and policies have long exemplified the problems and

Publications

By:
Viola Gienger
Pakistan Finance Minister Mohammad Ishaq Dar wrapped up a round of road shows for international investors recently as the country returns to the bond markets after a multi-year hiatus. During an appearance at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) last week, he joked that he was still in sales mode as he gave an upbeat assessment of the government’s drive to strengthen the economy.
PakVotes, an experimental project run by a Pakistani NGO and supported by USIP, brought social media platforms together with a network of reporters to track violence during Pakistan’s 2013 elections. The experience offers lessons for the future use of social media to publicize conflicts and violence during elections and other major events.