Morocco

Sultan Mohammed V, the current monarch's grandfather, organized the new state as a constitutional monarchy and in 1957 assumed the title of king. Gradual political reforms in the 1990s resulted in the establishment of a bicameral legislature, which first met in 1997. Influenced by protests elsewhere in the region, in February 2011 thousands of Moroccans began weekly rallies in multiple cities across the country to demand greater democracy and end to government corruption. King Mohammed VI responded quickly with a reform program that included a new constitution and early elections. The constitution was passed by popular referendum in July 2011; some new powers were extended to parliament and the prime minister, but ultimate authority remains in the hands of the monarch. In early elections in November 2012, the Justice and Development Party - a moderate Islamist party, won the largest number of seats, becoming the first Islamist party to lead the Moroccan Government.

Osama Gharizi

Osama
Gharizi
Program Officer, Learning & Evaluation

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Osama Gharizi joined USIP as program officer for Learning and Evaluation in August 2013. He previously worked at the International Republican Institute (IRI) where he designed, managed and evaluated programs on governance, political party and civil society strengthening, and election observation. His time at IRI included directing survey research programs in Lebanon, managing monitoring and evaluation efforts in Egypt and leading IRI’s long-term election observation for the 2012 parliamentary elections in Georgia. He also worked on projects in Oman, Morocco and Jordan.

Role: 

USIP-Wilson Center Series on Arab Spring Impacts Concludes

In the last of a five-part series of papers and meetings on “Reshaping the Strategic Culture of the Middle East,” regional specialist Adeed Dawisha told an audience at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on June 12 that, contrary to some expectations, no clear political or ideological breach has opened up between the revolutionary states of the Arab Spring and the region’s status quo powers.

USIP Staff

The Arab Spring has produced “little palpable change” so far in spreading “robust democratic structures” throughout the region, said Dawisha, a political scientist at Miami University in Ohio and author most recently of “The Second Arab Awakening: Revolution, Democracy, and the Islamist Challenge from Tunis to Damascus.” Dawisha’s paper has been published jointly by USIP and the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars; as with other papers in the s

Thu, 06/13/2013 - 10:26
Type of Article: 

Reform, Revolution or Status Quo? Regional Dynamics in a Changing Arab World

Wed, 06/12/2013 - 10:00
Wed, 06/12/2013 - 11:30

Some experts predicted that the Arab rebellions which began in spring 2011 would widen the strategic and political gap between Arab states undergoing dramatic change and those defending the status quo. Dr. Adeed Dawisha argues that in fact, sectarian tensions and economic constraints have dampened the demonstration effect of the Arab uprisings on regional politics and transformation.

Experts: 

This meeting wass co-sponsored by the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center and the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Type of Event or Course: 

Joyce A. Kasee

Joyce
Kasee
Program Officer, Middle East & Africa

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Joyce A. Kasee is a program officer for the Middle East & Africa team, who joined USIP in 2009. Kasee currently serves as a member of USIP’s Iraq and North Africa programs. From 2010 to 2012, she worked in Iraq, including serving as country representative in Iraq, and managing USIP's Baghdad office.

Role: 

USIP Examines Security Sector Transformation in North Africa, Middle East

The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) held its third annual conference on security sector governance on May 10, drawing in activists from North Africa and the Middle East as well as former U.S. ambassadors to the region to assess the political and security-sector challenges arising from the “Arab Awakening.”

The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) held its third annual conference on security sector governance on May 10, drawing in activists from North Africa and the Middle East as well as former U.S. ambassadors to the region to assess the political and security-sector challenges arising from the “Arab Awakening.”

USIP Staff
Thu, 05/10/2012 - 16:47
Type of Article: 

The Islamists Are Coming

The Islamists Are Coming is the first book to survey the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab Spring. In this book, Robin Wright offers an overview and 10 experts identify Islamists in Algeria, Egypt (two), Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, the Palestinian territories, Syria, and Tunisia. Each chapter is designed to help both a general audience and specialists.

Robin Wright

A new book published by the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, The Islamists are Coming: Who They Really Are, was launched April 18 at an event at the Wilson Center in Washington. USIP senior fellow Robin Wright edited and wrote an overview chapter for the volume, which assesses the politics, intentions and capabilities of the many Islamist parties with millions of followers that have gained greater prominence since the uprisings of the Arab Spring.

Thu, 04/19/2012 - 08:15
Type of Article: 

Truth Commission Digital Collection

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management.  The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management

The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

Wed, 03/16/2011 - 16:14
Type of Article: 

Querine Hanlon

Querine
Hanlon
Special Advisor, North Africa

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Dr. Querine Hanlon is special advisor to the Center for Middle East and Africa at USIP. She currently leads projects on Tunisia, Middle East and North Africa security and justice sector reform and North Africa border security. Additionally, Hanlon works on violent extremism, armed groups, and security sector reform. Hanlon is conducting a major research project focused on designing a blueprint for security sector reform for the 21st century with Dr. Richard Shultz of the Fletcher School.

Articles & Analysis

June 13, 2013

In the last of a five-part series of papers and meetings on “Reshaping the Strategic Culture of the Middle East,” regional specialist Adeed Dawisha told an audience at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on June 12 that, contrary to some expectations, no clear political or ideological breach has opened up between the revolutionary states of the Arab Spring and the region’s status quo powers.

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Debra Liang-Fenton, Linda Bishai, Dorina Bekoe, Jacqueline H. Wilson

This course will be offered again in the Fall of 2014

Stemming electoral violence in transition and fragile environments requires understanding the broader landscape of the conflict and how that conflict is managed. With important elections in Africa on the horizon in 2014 and 2015, this course will examine specific examples from cases across Africa in order to analyze how electoral violence was prevented or mitigated through effective strategic planning and policymaking.

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In the last of a five-part series of papers and meetings on “Reshaping the Strategic Culture of the Middle East,” regional specialist Adeed Dawisha told an audience at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on June 12 that, contrary to some expectations, no clear political or ideological breach has opened up between the revolutionary states of the Arab Spring and the region’s status quo powers.
The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) held its third annual conference on security sector governance on May 10, drawing in activists from North Africa and the Middle East as well as former U.S. ambassadors to the region to assess the political and security-sector challenges arising from the “Arab Awakening.”