Malaysia

Use of Terrorist ‘Dropouts’ to Boost Defections: Dangerous Business

A former Singapore intelligence analyst examines government efforts to support terrorist group defectors in campaigns to de-radicalize others. She cautions that most such “dropouts” have merely adjusted their views rather than rejecting violence outright.

Terrorist “dropouts” from the ranks of militant organizations can be useful in coaxing others to defect, but authorities shouldn’t be fooled that former radicals completely changed their thinking, according to Susan Sim, vice president for Asia at the Soufan Group strategic consultancy.

Viola Gienger
Wed, 05/01/2013 - 12:51
Type of Article: 

Project on Conflict, Democracy and Security

Led by Daniel Brumberg, senior adviser to the Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention, this project examines the conditions surrounding political reform in unstable and/or divided societies, aiming to provide a guide for peaceful and inclusive democratic transformation.

For more than three years, USIP’s former Muslim World Initiative focused on problems of political reform and power sharing in the Arab world through an innovative Arab Political Oppositions Project.  The project highlighted the ways that leaders of political parties, nongovernmental organizations, civil society organizations, and official bodies in the Arab world have --or have not -- mobilized support for a common vision of political reform.

Topics: 

Muslim World Initiative

Building trust and dialogue between political, social and religious leaders

This initiative, which drew to a close in 2009, was designed to help to mobilize moderates, marginalize militants, and bridge the U.S./Muslim-world divide.

Topics: 

U.S.Relations with the Muslim World

Wed, 04/28/2010 - 08:00
Wed, 04/28/2010 - 18:30
Public Event

USIP, CSID, George Mason and ISESCO co-hosted this day-long conference examining America's relations with the Muslim world one year after President Obama's Cairo speech. 

Preliminary Program

8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Registration
8:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Welcoming Remarks

  • Peter Mandaville
    Chair, Program Committee
  • Radwan Masmoudi
    CSID President

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Panel 1: Plenary Session Roundtable: Perspectives on Muslim Engagement featuring Farah Pandith

  • Peter Mandaville, Chair
    George Mason University
  • Farah Pandith
    Special Representative to Muslim Communities, U.S. Department of State
  • Marc Lynch, respondent
    George Washington University
  • Emile Nakhleh, respondent
    Independent scholar
  • Brian Katulis, respondent
    The Center for American Progress
  • Daniel Brumberg, Respondent
    U.S. Institute of Peace

10:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Coffee Break

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Parallel Session 1: Muslim Perceptions & Public Opinion

  • Abiodun Williams, Chair
    Vice President, Conflict Prevention and Analysis, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • “Views of the U.S. in Post-Jihadist Thought”
    Omar Ashour, University of Exeter
  • “Muslim publics' views of the U.S.”
    Steven Kull, Worldpublicopinion.org
  • “A Nigerian Perspective on the Cairo Speech”
    Chloe Berwind-Dart, Cherish Foundation
  • “New Approaches to Public Diplomacy in the Muslim World”
    Kristin Lord, Center for a New American Security

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Parallel Session 2: Islam, Human Rights, and Development

  • Mona Yacoubian, Chair
    U.S. Institute of Peace
  • “The Obama Administration and Islamic Human Rights”
    Satoshi Ikeuchi, University of Tokyo
  • “Arab Youth Development in U.S.-Muslim Engagement”
    Oliver Wilcox & Chris Carneal, U.S. Agency for International Development, Middle East Bureau
  • “Political Islam and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Obama Era”
    Halim Rane, Griffith University
  • “Constructing Political Islam as the New Other”
    Corinna Mullin, School of Oriental & African Studies

12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Keynote Luncheon: Prospects for Improved Relations and Understanding Between the U.S. and the Muslim World

  • Congressman Keith Ellison (D-MN)
  • Tariq Ramadan
    Oxford University
  • Reza Aslan
    University of California, Riverside

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Plenary Session Amphitheater: Dialogue with Political Islamists

  • Daniel Brumberg, Moderator
    United States Institute of Peace
  • Mustapha Khalfi
    Justice & Development Party, Morocco
  • Zineddine Tebbal,
    Movement for the Society of Peace, Algeria
  • Salah Ali Abdulrahman
    Islah Movement, Bahrain
  • Quinn Mecham, Respondent
    Professor, Middlebury College
    Professor, George Washington University
    Franklin Fellow, Policy Planning, U.S. Department of State

3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Coffee Break

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Parallel Session 3: Voices from the Middle East

  • Emad El-Din Shahin, Chair
    University of Notre Dame
  • “Civil Society Organizations as Actors of Change in the MENA Region: Potentialities and Challenges”
    Nabila Hamza, Foundation for the Future, Amman, Jordan
  • “The U.S. Image among Arab’s New Generation: Finding and Recommendations from Experimental Research”
    Moataz A. Fattah, Cairo University & Central Michigan University
  • “Back to the Spirit of the Cairo Speech: From Marshall Plan to Obama Plan”
    Alaya Allani, University of Tunis
  • "Taliban’s Islamic State, Obama’s Olive Branch and Democracy in the Muslim World: An Examination of Governance in Contemporary Pakistan"
    Abdullah Al-Ahsan, International Islamic University, Malaysia

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Parallel Session 4: Democracy & Democracy Promotion

  • Asma Afsaruddin, Chair
    Indiana University
  • “Evaluating Obama’s Contributions to Iran’s Democratic Opposition”
    Laila Taraghi, University of Arkansas
  • “The Role of the U.S. in Encouraging Pro-Democracy Movements”
    Stephen Zunes, University of San Francisco
  • “Applying Sustainable Democracy Promotion to the Muslim World”
    Eric Patterson, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs
  • "Challenges to Integrating Democracy Promotion in U.S. Policy in Afghanistan and Pakistan"
    Brian Katulis, The Center for American Progress

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Concluding Keynote: Building Bridges of Understanding Between America and Muslim Majority States

  • Rashad Hussain
    U. S. Special Envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference

 

This USIP co-sponsored event examined U.S. relations with the Muslim world one year after President Obama's pivotal speech at Cairo University.  Speakers included Oxford professor Tariq Ramadan, Special Representative to Muslim Communities Farah Pandith, and U. S.  Special Envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference Rashad Hussain.  USIP specialists Abiodun Williams, Daniel Brumberg and Mona Yacoubian also participated in the event.

 

Ronald Reagan Building Amphitheater
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20004

Muslim World Initiative logoCSID logoGeorge Mason University logoISESCO logo

Type of Event or Course: 

Engaging the Muslim World

Thu, 10/15/2009 - 09:30
Thu, 10/15/2009 - 12:00
Public Event

USIP's Daniel Brumberg joined a panel of guest speakers, including Congressman Keith Ellison, for a lively discussion of USIP's new volume "Conflict, Identity, and Reform in the Muslim World."

United States Institute of Peace
2nd Floor Conference Room
1200 17th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036


 

For more information or questions, contact Leslie Thompson (lthompson@usip.org, 202-429-3896)

As the U.S. and its Western allies look beyond a decade of estrangement with a Muslim world increasingly fragmented by its own domestic and regional conflicts, the impetus for dialogue with both friends and foes has grown in concert with the benefit and risks associated with a sustained strategy of engagement. What are the obstacles to and opportunities for creating new avenues of U.S.-Muslim world engagement and cooperation? Are the barriers and openings rooted in a long enduring cultural or religious divide?

Type of Event or Course: 

Articles & Analysis

May 1, 2013

A former Singapore intelligence analyst examines government efforts to support terrorist group defectors in campaigns to de-radicalize others. She cautions that most such “dropouts” have merely adjusted their views rather than rejecting violence outright.

Learn More

Publications

By:
Viola Gienger
A former Singapore intelligence analyst examines government efforts to support terrorist group defectors in campaigns to de-radicalize others. She cautions that most such “dropouts” have merely adjusted their views rather than rejecting violence outright.
By:
USIP Staff
Led by Daniel Brumberg, senior adviser to the Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention, this project examines the conditions surrounding political reform in unstable and/or divided societies, aiming to provide a guide for peaceful and inclusive democratic transformation.