Lebanon

USIP's goal in Lebanon is to develop proposals, ideas and policy recommendations that will prevent conflict within Lebanon and across its borders. These programs and additional work increase the policy community's knowledge about Lebanon and encourage communication and collaboration among experts in and outside of Lebanon.

Osama Gharizi

Osama
Gharizi
Program Officer, Learning & Evaluation

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Osama Gharizi joined USIP as program officer for Learning and Evaluation in August 2013. He previously worked at the International Republican Institute (IRI) where he designed, managed and evaluated programs on governance, political party and civil society strengthening, and election observation. His time at IRI included directing survey research programs in Lebanon, managing monitoring and evaluation efforts in Egypt and leading IRI’s long-term election observation for the 2012 parliamentary elections in Georgia. He also worked on projects in Oman, Morocco and Jordan.

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Darine El Hage

Darine
El Hage
Regional Program Officer, Center for Middle East and Africa

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Darine El Hage is a regional program officer in USIP’s Center for Middle East and Africa based in Beirut, Lebanon. El Hage trains, mentors, and advises on organizational development, international human rights, refugee protection, humanitarian law, and NGO capacity-building related themes. Prior to joining USIP, El Hage was working for the Center for Victims of Torture (CVT) on its New Tactics in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) Initiative, a capacity-building program for local human rights organizations in Egypt and Tunisia in human rights advocacy.

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Syria’s Sectarian Ripples across the Gulf

This Peace Brief, one of a five-part series on sectarianism in the Middle East, reviews how the Syrian crisis has affected the Gulf Arab states.

Frederic Wehrey

Summary

  • Like the Iraq war and, to a lesser extent, Lebanon’s 2006 war, Syria’s internecine conflict has enabled the Gulf’s ruling families, media commentators, clerics, parliamentarians, and activists to invoke and amplify Sunni-Shia identities, often for goals that are rooted in local power politics.
  • By-products of the mounting sectarian tension include the fraying of reform cooperation among sects and regions, and pressure on the Gulf’s formal political institutions.
Mon, 11/18/2013 - 15:44

Sectarianism in Lebanon and Syria

The Peace Brief, “Sectarianism in Lebanon and Syria,” assesses how Syria’s crisis has influenced Lebanon’s sectarian and political dynamics. It is one of a five-part series about sectarianism in the Middle East.

Joseph Bahout

Summary

  • When the Arab revolutions reached Syria, the Sunni-Shia cleavage in Lebanon was already well in the making. Syria’s turmoil only added fuel to an existing fire in Lebanon.
  • Syria’s crisis is intensifying Sunni-Shia tensions in Lebanon on two levels, symbolic and identity-based on the one hand, and geopolitical or interest based, on the other hand.
Mon, 11/18/2013 - 14:48
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Partners (HTML): 

The Syrian Conflict’s Impact on Lebanese Politics

This Peace Brief, one of a five-part series on sectarianism in the Middle East, examines the impact of the Syrian conflict on Lebanon’s politics and political stability.

Melani Cammett

Summary

  • The Syrian crisis has had a negative impact on Lebanon’s political scene, including the dynamics among political factions within and across the country’s major sectarian communities.
  • The political fragmentation of the Sunni community has implications for the growing trend toward political violence triggered by the Syrian conflict. The rise of challengers and the decline of centralized authority within the Sunni community further increase the probability of violence perpetrated by in-group factions.
Mon, 11/18/2013 - 12:22
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Navigating the Rise of Sunni-Shia Violent Sectarianism

A recent PEW Research Center report examined polls conducted between November 2011 and May 2012. It found that 52 percent of Muslims polled in Iraq, 44 percent in Afghanistan and 67 percent in Lebanon said Sunni-Shia tensions are a “very big or moderately big” problem in their country. The re-escalation of violence in Iraq this year likely would have increased the concern there if the polling were conducted today.

Elie Abouaoun, DDS

Elie
Abouaoun
Director, Middle East Programs

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Dr. Elie Abouaoun is the director of Middle East Programs as well as acting director for North Africa with the Center for Middle East and Africa at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Elie served until recently as a senior program officer for the Middle East and North Africa programs. Previously, he held the position of Executive Director at the Arab Human Rights Fund after an assignment as a Senior Program Officer at the U.S. Institute of Peace – Iraq program.

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USIP Prevention Newsletter - September 2012

The September 2012 Prevention Newsletter features a spotlight on The Syrian Civil War: Threatening Lebanon's Fragile Stability: Syria's year-and-a-half long internal strife has not only challenged Lebanon with tens of thousands of refugees, gun battles on the border and kidnappings, but reignited tensions along Lebanon's own sectarian fault lines.

In this Issue

  • SPOTLIGHT on The Syrian Civil War: Threatening Lebanon's Fragile Stability: Syria's year-and-a-half long internal strife has not only challenged Lebanon with tens of thousands of refugees, gun battles on the border and kidnappings, but reignited tensions along Lebanon's own sectarian fault lines.
  • HIGHLIGHTS:
    • U.S.-Pakistan Relations
    • Tensions on Korean Peninsula
    • Iran and P5+1 Nuclear Talks
    • Responsibility to Protect: Moving Beyond the Period of Reflection
    • The Political Transition in Libya
Mon, 09/03/2012 - 09:51

USIP Prevention Newsletter - March 2012

The March 2012 Prevention Newsletter features a spotlight on U.S.-Pakistan Relations: The year 2011 saw a progressive deterioration in the U.S.-Pakistan relationship. But despite the fact that mutual mistrust is probably at an all time high, there is no appetite to allow the relationship to rupture.

In this Issue

  • SPOTLIGHT on U.S.-Pakistan Relations: The year 2011 saw a progressive deterioration in the U.S.-Pakistan relationship. But despite the fact that mutual mistrust is probably at an all time high, there is no appetite to allow the relationship to rupture.
  • HIGHLIGHTS:
    • Political Transitions amid Economic Turmoil in North Africa 
    • North Korea's New Leadership
    • The Nuclear Question in Iran
    • Israel-Palestine Peace Process 
    • Institutionalizing U.S. Atrocity Prevention Efforts
Thu, 03/01/2012 - 09:00

America's Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace

Tue, 02/19/2013 - 13:00
Tue, 02/19/2013 - 15:00
Subtitle: 
What Lies Ahead
Public Event

As President Barack Obama embarks on his second term and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu builds his coalition government, many warn that time is running out for the two-state solution. On the occasion of its publication, the authors of “The Peace Puzzle: America’s Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace” discussed their own views on whether and why that door is closing, and what the next Obama administration can do to keep it open.

As President Barack Obama embarks on his second term and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu builds his coalition government, many warn that time is running out for the two-state solution. On the occasion of its publication, David Ignatius joined three of the authors of “The Peace Puzzle: America’s Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace” and USIP's Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen to discuss their own views on whether and why that door is closing, and what the next Obama administration can do to keep it open.

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Articles & Analysis

November 15, 2013
A recent PEW Research Center report examined polls conducted between November 2011 and May 2012. It found that 52 percent of Muslims polled in Iraq, 44 percent in Afghanistan and 67 percent in Lebanon said Sunni-Shia tensions are a “very big or moderately big” problem in their country. The re-escalation of violence in Iraq this year likely would have increased the concern there if the polling were conducted today.
October 22, 2012
By:
USIP Staff
March 16, 2012
By:
USIP Staff
January 13, 2012
By:
Steven Heydemann
November 29, 2011
By:
J. Robinson West

Our Work in the Field

Learn More

Publications

By:
Frederic Wehrey
This Peace Brief, one of a five-part series on sectarianism in the Middle East, reviews how the Syrian crisis has affected the Gulf Arab states.
By:
Joseph Bahout
The Peace Brief, “Sectarianism in Lebanon and Syria,” assesses how Syria’s crisis has influenced Lebanon’s sectarian and political dynamics. It is one of a five-part series about sectarianism in the Middle East.