Jordan

Following World War I and the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the League of Nations awarded Britain the mandate to govern much of the Middle East. Britain demarcated a semi-autonomous region of Transjordan from Palestine in the early 1920s. The area gained its independence in 1946 and thereafter became The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The country's long-time ruler, King Hussein (1953-99), successfully navigated competing pressures from the major powers (US, USSR, and UK), various Arab states, Israel, and a large internal Palestinian population. Jordan lost the West Bank to Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War. King Hussein in 1988 permanently relinquished Jordanian claims to the West Bank; in 1994 he signed a peace treaty with Israel. King Abdallah II, King Hussein's eldest son, assumed the throne following his father's death in 1999. He implemented modest political and economic reforms, but in the wake of the "Arab Revolution" across the Middle East, Jordanians continue to press for further political liberalization, government reforms, and economic improvements.

Community Policing against Violent Extremism Reveals Common Factors

From Northern Ireland to Somalia to Pakistan, police leaders and ministry officials attending a series of courses that USIP co-hosted on community policing expressed surprise that they faced common challenges -- from the threat of violent extremism and from the complexities of their own organizations.

Nathaniel L. Wilson

USIP conducted the three-workshop series April 13-17 in Abu Dhabi with Hedayah, the International Center of Excellence for Countering Violent Extremism (CVE), which conducts training, dialogue, collaboration and research on the topic. The workshops with USIP led seven teams of police leaders and ministry officials from Nigeria, Jordan, Tunisia, Somalia, Morocco, Pakistan and Northern Ireland in developing national strategies to strengthen or, in some cases, establish an ethos of community policing. Community policing combines security with service to the population.

Mon, 05/19/2014 - 11:35
Type of Article: 

Osama Gharizi

Osama
Gharizi
Program Officer, Learning & Evaluation

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Osama Gharizi joined USIP as program officer for Learning and Evaluation in August 2013. He previously worked at the International Republican Institute (IRI) where he designed, managed and evaluated programs on governance, political party and civil society strengthening, and election observation. His time at IRI included directing survey research programs in Lebanon, managing monitoring and evaluation efforts in Egypt and leading IRI’s long-term election observation for the 2012 parliamentary elections in Georgia. He also worked on projects in Oman, Morocco and Jordan.

Role: 

Reform, Revolution or Status Quo? Regional Dynamics in a Changing Arab World

Wed, 06/12/2013 - 10:00
Wed, 06/12/2013 - 11:30

Some experts predicted that the Arab rebellions which began in spring 2011 would widen the strategic and political gap between Arab states undergoing dramatic change and those defending the status quo. Dr. Adeed Dawisha argues that in fact, sectarian tensions and economic constraints have dampened the demonstration effect of the Arab uprisings on regional politics and transformation.

Experts: 

This meeting wass co-sponsored by the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center and the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Type of Event or Course: 

Jordan Election Turnout Masks Risk of Shaky Economy and King’s Restive Base

USIP’s continuing series on “sleeper risks” looks at how King Abdullah is facing challenges to his legitimacy from a broader coalition of groups than the high-profile opposition from the Muslim Brotherhood. Economic protests could create a hair-trigger scenario exacerbated by frustration among the monarch’s traditional base.

Many of the clearest risks of conflict, violence and instability around the world have received widespread media attention. But a variety of other risks and threats have been smoldering quietly. The United States Institute of Peace (USIP) is engaged in a variety of peacebuilding and conflict management efforts in many of the countries where these lesser-known risks are emerging.

Viola Gienger
Wed, 02/20/2013 - 13:54
Countries: 

Breaking through Jordan’s Apathy Barrier?

Jordanians go to the polls on Jan. 23 to elect a new lower house of parliament.  Since the last national elections in 2010, Jordan’s political landscape has been shaken by the Arab uprisings of 2011, the economy has deteriorated, and the violence of the Syrian revolution to the north has sent some 142,000 refugees fleeing into the country. Yet in the midst of this political and economic turmoil, many Jordanians have responded to the forthcoming elections with a collective shrug of the shoulders.

America's Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace

Tue, 02/19/2013 - 13:00
Tue, 02/19/2013 - 15:00
Subtitle: 
What Lies Ahead
Public Event

As President Barack Obama embarks on his second term and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu builds his coalition government, many warn that time is running out for the two-state solution. On the occasion of its publication, the authors of “The Peace Puzzle: America’s Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace” discussed their own views on whether and why that door is closing, and what the next Obama administration can do to keep it open.

As President Barack Obama embarks on his second term and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu builds his coalition government, many warn that time is running out for the two-state solution. On the occasion of its publication, David Ignatius joined three of the authors of “The Peace Puzzle: America’s Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace” and USIP's Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen to discuss their own views on whether and why that door is closing, and what the next Obama administration can do to keep it open.

Type of Event or Course: 

The Islamists Are Coming

The Islamists Are Coming is the first book to survey the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab Spring. In this book, Robin Wright offers an overview and 10 experts identify Islamists in Algeria, Egypt (two), Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, the Palestinian territories, Syria, and Tunisia. Each chapter is designed to help both a general audience and specialists.

Robin Wright

A new book published by the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, The Islamists are Coming: Who They Really Are, was launched April 18 at an event at the Wilson Center in Washington. USIP senior fellow Robin Wright edited and wrote an overview chapter for the volume, which assesses the politics, intentions and capabilities of the many Islamist parties with millions of followers that have gained greater prominence since the uprisings of the Arab Spring.

Thu, 04/19/2012 - 08:15
Type of Article: 

Through a Glass Darkly? The Middle East in 2012

In a period of tremendous change in parts of the world, we are asking USIP leaders, from board members to senior staff and experts, to explain the effects that events abroad and here at home will have on the United States, and the contributions the Institute can and does make. Steven Heydemann is USIP’s senior adviser for Middle East Initiatives.

Steven Heydemann

This past year offered fresh proof that the world we live in is ever dynamic. Fundamental change can come from something as extraordinary as a fruit vendor’s act of defiance in Tunisia to popular revolts by reform movements across the Middle East. At the same time, a decade of war and the weak U.S. economy dictates that there must be new ways to think about the role the U.S. will play in the world in the coming years.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 16:30
Type of Article: 

A Year of Turmoil

Wed, 01/18/2012 - 07:30
Wed, 01/18/2012 - 09:00
Subtitle: 
The Arab Awakening and the Path Ahead
Public Event

In May, President Obama defined the Arab Spring as a “historic opportunity” to redefine and strengthen America’s relationships in the Middle East, demonstrating that “America values the dignity of the street vendor . . . more than the raw power of the dictator.” One year after the “Jasmine Revolution” in Tunisia, has the promise of the Arab Awakening been realized? Please join former national security adviser Stephen Hadley and former Jordanian foreign minister Marwan Muasher on Wednesday, January 18, as they lead an analysis and discussion of what the Arab Awakening means for 2012.

One year ago, the horrific, desperate act of a simple fruit seller set in motion a chain reaction of events that led to the demise of autocratic governments across North Africa – the Arab Awakening.

Reserve Officers Association
One Constitution Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20002
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Inquiries

For more information on this event please contact Cheryl Saferstein at csaferstein@usip.org or 202-429-4728.

Type of Event or Course: 

The Arab Awakening

As the dramatic events of the Arab Spring turn to the more mundane yet vital work of governance, constitution writing and peacebuilding, USIP is on the ground, bringing its unique brand of action and expertise to the effort.

In a period of tremendous change in parts of the world, we are asking USIP leaders, from board members to senior staff and experts, to explain the effects that events abroad and here at home will have on the United States, and the contributions the Institute can and does make. Steven Heydemann is USIP’s senior adviser for Middle East Initiatives. | Read the Q+A

 

Sun, 01/08/2012 - 17:04

Articles & Analysis

May 19, 2014

From Northern Ireland to Somalia to Pakistan, police leaders and ministry officials attending a series of courses that USIP co-hosted on community policing expressed surprise that they faced common challenges -- from the threat of violent extremism and from the complexities of their own organizations.

Our Work in the Field

From Northern Ireland to Somalia to Pakistan, police leaders and ministry officials attending a series of courses that USIP co-hosted on community policing expressed surprise that they faced common challenges -- from the threat of violent...

Mike Lekson, Ted Feifer, and Noor Kirdar of the Professional Training program led a workshop on multilateral diplomacy for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Mediterranean Partners, in cooperation with the Spanish...

Following 2004´s training workshops for Iraqi national security officials (conducted in the U.S.) and for community leaders/civic activists (conducted in Baghdad and Sulaymaniyah), our priority for 2005 was to bring the two participant audiences...

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Publications

From Northern Ireland to Somalia to Pakistan, police leaders and ministry officials attending a series of courses that USIP co-hosted on community policing expressed surprise that they faced common challenges -- from the threat of violent extremism and from the complexities of their own organizations.
USIP’s continuing series on “sleeper risks” looks at how King Abdullah is facing challenges to his legitimacy from a broader coalition of groups than the high-profile opposition from the Muslim Brotherhood. Economic protests could create a hair-trigger scenario exacerbated by frustration among the monarch’s traditional base.