Iran

USIP conducts ongoing research and policy analysis on major developments in Iran through the Iran Study Group and the Iran Primer. USIP experts provide regular briefings for Congressional staffers and officials at the Department of State.

Inside Iran

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 09:30
Thu, 01/09/2014 - 11:00
Subtitle: 
With Robin Wright and David Ignatius

Two long-time Middle East experts have recently returned from Iran. Their discussions with cabinet members, ayatollahs, hardliners, Members of Parliament, economists, opposition figures and ordinary Iranians offer rare insights into Iran’s increasingly vibrant political scene since President Rouhani took office and the implications of the new nuclear agreement. Robin Wright and David Ignatius offer fresh perspectives on what’s next.

Please join us for a moderated discussion on these and other issues important to Iran, its internal politics, and its relations with the world. Join the conversation on Twitter with #InsideIran.

This event will feature the following speakers:

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Icebergs Ahead

The interim nuclear deal with Iran was huge -- but a permanent solution is going to be much, much harder to reach. By Thomas Omestad

The temporary deal to halt or roll back parts of Iran's nuclear program in return for modest sanctions relief is an impressive, if perishable, success for U.S.-led diplomacy. But the negotiations among Iran, the United States, and five other world powers to find a comprehensive solution on Iran's nuclear program, which begin Feb. 18 in Vienna, will face far greater challenges.

Thomas Omestad
Tue, 02/18/2014 - 09:09
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Media That Moves Millions

Three years to the month since protests swept across the Middle East, the new year once again sees peaceful demonstrators facing off against hardened and sometimes violent security forces, this time in the Ukraine. And like in the Arab Spring, social media is being said to play a significant and potentially decisive role in empowering Euromaidan protesters in ways that couldn't have been imagined a decade ago.

Sheldon Himelfarb and Sean Aday

While the world watches the Ukraine protests unfold, however, the narrative of how social media helped fuel democratic protests during the Arab Spring is undergoing a major revision. The democratic gains of early 2011 have proven largely ephemeral. Initial optimism about the future of the region's women and youth has dampened, and generalized violence plagues countries once thought to be on the cusp of a brighter future, such as Libya, Iraq, and Syria.

Fri, 01/17/2014 - 13:21
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Wright, Ignatius Analyze Iran Developments

Prospects for a long-term nuclear deal with Iran are better today than in decades because of a new government of “realists,” growing social problems and economic pressure, according to two veteran journalists who recently returned from Iran. But they also told an audience at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on January 9 that a final breakthrough faces tough opposition in both Iran and the United States.

USIP Staff

“Iran will compromise a lot to get it,” Robin Wright, a USIP-Wilson Center distinguished scholar, said of a prospective deal being negotiated with the aim of ensuring that Iran’s nuclear activities are for peaceful purposes. “They want to move on.” Iran and the world’s six major powers agreed on November 23 to an interim deal freezing key aspects of Iran’s nuclear program to allow six months of talks on a final agreement.

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 15:56
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A Moderate Proposal

2014 promises to be a make or break year for U.S.-Iran policy -- and for the very future of Iran itself. Indeed, the Obama administration's capacity to influence events in the wider Middle East will hinge, in part, on whether it can negotiate the November 2013 Interim Nuclear deal to a final agreement.

Daniel Brumberg

The administration has already taken the very step that no previous one had dared imagine: it has decisively embraced diplomacy over military force, and brought strategic coherence to U.S.-Iran policy. But in moving forward the White House has also precariously raised the stakes: A collapse of the negotiations would not only signal that the region's most enduring global conflict is beyond the pale of rational solution -- the failure of nuclear diplomacy would kill also off the chances for internal political reform in Iran itself.

Mon, 01/06/2014 - 14:06
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Garrett Nada

Garrett
Nada
Senior Program Assistant, Iran & Middle East Programs

Garrett Nada is a senior program assistant at the U.S. Institute of Peace in the Center for Middle East & Africa. In this capacity, he writes, edits and researches for two ongoing projects. “The Iran Primer” website provides objective analysis on Iran’s politics, economy, military, foreign policy and nuclear program. “The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are” website surveys the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab uprisings. Nada liaisons with contributors to the websites, coordinates with media partners and promotes new articles on social media.

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Maral Noori

Maral
Noori
Program Assistant, Asia-Pacific Program

Maral Noori is a program assistant in the Asia-Pacific Program at the U.S. Institute of Peace. She works on North East Asia, the East and South China Seas, as well as Myanmar. She supports the Institute’s ongoing Track 1.5 Dialogues with partners in China, Japan, and South Korea; the Korea Working Group; the Naval Attaché Roundtable Meetings; and various additional activities and projects. Noori joined the Asia Pacific Program in October 2013.

Iran Agreement Sets Agenda for Talks Toward Larger Pact

The agreement delineates a plan for real, cooperative activities that achieve initial goals for each side: some of the sanctions relief sought by Iran, and Tehran’s freeze on nuclear progress sought by the P5+1 group (made up of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council – the U.S., U.K., France, Russia and China, plus Germany).

The Reluctant Sectarianism of Foreign States in the Syrian Conflict

This Peace Brief, one of a five-part series on sectarianism in the Middle East, analyzes the regional sectarianism and dynamics related to the Syrian conflict.

Thomas Pierret

Summary

  • The Syrian conflict’s internal dynamics have reshuffled regional alignments alongside unprecedentedly clear-cut sectarian dividing lines; this has often occurred against the preferences of regional state actors − including Saudi Arabia and Iran.
  • Foreign states have generally adopted expedient policies that followed sectarian patterns for lack of alternatives.
  • Iran bears significant responsibility for exacerbating the conflict’s sectarian character at the regional level.
Mon, 11/18/2013 - 15:53
Partners (HTML): 

Alan Kuperman

Alan
Kuperman
Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow

Alan Kuperman is a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow.

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Alan J. Kuperman is a 2013-2014 Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow. In his project, “Humanitarian Blowback? Lessons for Future Intervention,” he investigates the successes and failures of humanitarian intervention, from which he will derive recommendations for future implementation of the “Responsibility to Protect.” The project draws on his 15 years of field interviews with rebels, government officials, and interveners in the deadly conflicts of Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Darfur, Liberia, and Libya.

Articles & Analysis

February 18, 2014
The temporary deal to halt or roll back parts of Iran's nuclear program in return for modest sanctions relief is an impressive, if perishable, success for U.S.-led diplomacy. But the negotiations among Iran, the United States, and five other world powers to find a comprehensive solution on Iran's nuclear program, which begin Feb. 18 in Vienna, will face far greater challenges.
January 17, 2014
By:
Sheldon Himelfarb and Sean Aday
January 9, 2014
By:
USIP Staff
January 6, 2014
By:
Daniel Brumberg
November 25, 2013
By:
George A. Lopez
November 5, 2013
By:
Viola Gienger

Our Work in the Field

Learn More

Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Bruce MacDonald, Michael Lekson

Examine the challenges and implications of Iran’s nuclear program and Pakistan’s expanding nuclear arsenal, in terms both of regional stability and the global nonproliferation regime. Increase your understanding of the role of nuclear weapons in international security challenges and of ways to manage the threats they pose.

Iran’s approaching nuclear weapons capability has been a source of increasing international anxiety and concern, while Pakistani nuclear actions and policies have long exemplified the problems and

Publications

By:
Thomas Omestad
The interim nuclear deal with Iran was huge -- but a permanent solution is going to be much, much harder to reach. By Thomas Omestad
Three years to the month since protests swept across the Middle East, the new year once again sees peaceful demonstrators facing off against hardened and sometimes violent security forces, this time in the Ukraine. And like in the Arab Spring, social media is being said to play a significant and potentially decisive role in empowering Euromaidan protesters in ways that couldn't have been imagined a decade ago.