Iran

USIP conducts ongoing research and policy analysis on major developments in Iran through the Iran Study Group and the Iran Primer. USIP experts provide regular briefings for Congressional staffers and officials at the Department of State.

Iran Sanctions: What the U.S. Cedes in a Nuclear Deal

Tue, 07/08/2014 - 09:30
Tue, 07/08/2014 - 11:00

The last event in our three-part series addressed the complex questions and challenges of sanctions in the Iran nuclear talks.

Experts: 

Since 2006, the United States has imposed more sanctions on Iran than any other country, so it may have to cede the most ground to get a nuclear deal in 2014. Over the years, Republican and Democratic administrations have issued at least 16 executive orders, and Congress has passed ten acts imposing punitive sanctions. What does Tehran want? What are the six major powers considering as incentives to cooperate? What isn’t on the table? The White House and Congress have imposed their own types of sanctions. What would either need to do to lift them?

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Inside Iran

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 09:30
Thu, 01/09/2014 - 11:00
Subtitle: 
With Robin Wright and David Ignatius

Two long-time Middle East experts have recently returned from Iran. Their discussions with cabinet members, ayatollahs, hardliners, Members of Parliament, economists, opposition figures and ordinary Iranians offer rare insights into Iran’s increasingly vibrant political scene since President Rouhani took office and the implications of the new nuclear agreement. Robin Wright and David Ignatius offer fresh perspectives on what’s next.

Please join us for a moderated discussion on these and other issues important to Iran, its internal politics, and its relations with the world. Join the conversation on Twitter with #InsideIran.

This event will feature the following speakers:

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Iran Sanctions and the Possible Trade-Offs for a Nuclear Deal

Over the years, Republican and Democratic administrations have issued at least 16 executive orders, and Congress has passed 10 statutes imposing punitive sanctions. What does Tehran want? What are the six major powers considering as incentives—and what isn’t on the table? What will the White House and Congress separately have to do to lift them? The following is a rundown of the panelists’ main points.

Nuclear Flashpoints: US-Iran Tensions Over Timetables and Terms

Remaining differences include: how many years an agreement would last and how long a deal would defer the time it would take for Iran to produce enough nuclear fuel for a bomb. The U.S. prefers an agreement that would cover decades, in contrast to Iran’s preferred timeline of a few years. The steps or phases of an agreement also are not yet clear, nor are requirements for Iranian or U.S. action.

Nuclear Flashpoints: U.S.-Iran Tensions Over Terms and Timetables

Tue, 06/10/2014 - 09:30
Tue, 06/10/2014 - 11:00

The second event in our three-part series explored key conflicts and possible trade offs in a final nuclear deal with Iran. 

A final deal with Iran will have to sort out a dizzying array of timetables and disparate interpretation of terms. Among them: How many years will an agreement last? Iran prefers a few; the U.S. is thinking decades. Breakout time - how long it'd take to produce enough nuclear fuel for a bomb - is now estimated to be two months; how long will a deal defer it? When will Tehran have to take what action - and in what steps or phases? And when will the U.S. have to act - and how?

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Countdown to the Final Iran Nuclear Deal

The clock is ticking on an agreement with Iran to curb its nuclear program. The deadline is July 20. Any final agreement will have to resolve disputes over at least 10 disparate issues, with many possible formulations. The issues include Iran’s nuclear facilities, enrichment capabilities and centrifuge numbers, research and development, timelines, ballistic missile systems, inspections and verification, access to scientists, as well as coming clean on past activities.

The Rubik’s Cube (tm) of a Final Agreement

Tue, 05/13/2014 - 09:30
Tue, 05/13/2014 - 11:00

In the final stretch of nuclear diplomacy with Iran, experts will analyze the disparate issues to be resolved and the many formulations of an agreement. 

9:30- 9:35 AM: Welcome

  • Ambassador William Taylor
    Vice President, Center for Middle East & Africa, U.S. Institute of Peace

9:35- 10:15 AM: Moderated Panel Discussion

  • Robert Einhorn
    Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution and former Special Advisor to the Secretary of State
  • Alireza Nader
    RAND Corporation and author of Iran After the Bomb
  • Joe Cirincione
    President of the Ploughshares Fund
  • Colin Kahl, Moderator
    Center for New American Security and former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense

10:15-11:00 AM: Q&A

The clock is ticking on a nuclear deal with Iran. The deadline is July 20. An unprecedented coalition of eight Washington think tanks is hosting three discussions on the pivotal diplomacy to coincide with the last three rounds of talks. The first event — "The Rubik’s CubeTM of a Final Agreement" — on May 13 will explore the 10 disparate issues to be resolved and the many formulations for potential solutions.

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From Détente to Meltdown

As "self-defense forces" storm Ukrainian bases in Crimea and Russian President Vladimir Putin embraces the peninsula's return to the Russian Motherland, Moscow's adventurism is creating a dangerous ripple effect far beyond the cold shores of Crimea. With Russia, the United States, and Europe dancing around the abyss of a new Cold War, Moscow's cooperation in resolving other international disputes will be severely tested. The first casualty of the Crimea debacle could be the ongoing efforts of Russia, the United States, and the other P5+1 countries -- China, Britain, France, and Germany -- to reach a final agreement limiting Iran's nuclear program.

Daniel Brumberg

Yet there is much more at stake than the nuclear negotiations. As this week's Vienna talks unfold, and as other rounds follow, lead negotiator Foreign Minister Javad Zarif will also be engaged in a shadow play with his ultra-conservative rivals back in Iran. He knows that the outcome of the nuclear talks will shape the trajectory of Iran's domestic and foreign politics for decades. Indeed, the embryonic effort of Zarif and President Hassan Rouhani to pry open Iran's closed politics largely depends on advancing both the idea and the practice of global détente.

Thu, 03/20/2014 - 12:47
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Icebergs Ahead

The interim nuclear deal with Iran was huge -- but a permanent solution is going to be much, much harder to reach. By Thomas Omestad

The temporary deal to halt or roll back parts of Iran's nuclear program in return for modest sanctions relief is an impressive, if perishable, success for U.S.-led diplomacy. But the negotiations among Iran, the United States, and five other world powers to find a comprehensive solution on Iran's nuclear program, which begin Feb. 18 in Vienna, will face far greater challenges.

Thomas Omestad
Tue, 02/18/2014 - 09:09
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Articles & Analysis

Since 2006, the United States has imposed more sanctions on Iran than any other country, so it may have to cede the most ground to get a nuclear deal in 2014. An expert panel assembled by eight...

By:
Garrett Nada

Another round of diplomatic talks over Iran’s nuclear program with six world powers starts June 16. Despite the promise of a potential deal, the most recent round of negotiations exposed the still...

By:
Garrett Nada

As the clock ticks toward a July 20 deadline for a nuclear deal with Iran, two former U.S. officials, a RAND Corp. analyst and a longtime advocate for eliminating the threat of nuclear weapons...

By:
Garrett Nada

Videos & Webcasts

The last event in our three-part series addressed the complex questions and challenges of sanctions in the Iran nuclear talks.

Two long-time Middle East experts have recently returned from Iran. Their discussions with cabinet members, ayatollahs, hardliners, Members of Parliament, economists, opposition figures and...

Members of USIP’s Internal Iran Study Group discussed a range of dynamics in the universities, opposition, the economy and even the security apparatus that often escape the foreign headlines and...

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Publications

By:
Thomas Pierret
This Peace Brief, one of a five-part series on sectarianism in the Middle East, analyzes the regional sectarianism and dynamics related to the Syrian conflict.
The May 2013 Prevention Newsletter features a Q&A with the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Adama Dieng, on the Responsibility to Protect and highlights the role of security...