Iran

USIP conducts ongoing research and policy analysis on major developments in Iran, which is available on The Iran Primer website. USIP experts also provide regular briefings for Congressional staffers and officials at the Department of State and other branches of the U.S. government.

Iran Sanctions: What the U.S. Cedes in a Nuclear Deal

Tue, 07/08/2014 - 09:30
Tue, 07/08/2014 - 11:00

The last event in our three-part series addressed the complex questions and challenges of sanctions in the Iran nuclear talks.

Experts: 

Since 2006, the United States has imposed more sanctions on Iran than any other country, so it may have to cede the most ground to get a nuclear deal in 2014. Over the years, Republican and Democratic administrations have issued at least 16 executive orders, and Congress has passed ten acts imposing punitive sanctions. What does Tehran want? What are the six major powers considering as incentives to cooperate? What isn’t on the table? The White House and Congress have imposed their own types of sanctions. What would either need to do to lift them?

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Inside Iran

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 09:30
Thu, 01/09/2014 - 11:00
Subtitle: 
With Robin Wright and David Ignatius

Two long-time Middle East experts have recently returned from Iran. Their discussions with cabinet members, ayatollahs, hardliners, Members of Parliament, economists, opposition figures and ordinary Iranians offer rare insights into Iran’s increasingly vibrant political scene since President Rouhani took office and the implications of the new nuclear agreement. Robin Wright and David Ignatius offer fresh perspectives on what’s next.

Read the event coverage, Wright, Ignatius Analyze Iran Developments

Please join us for a moderated discussion on these and other issues important to Iran, its internal politics, and its relations with the world. Join the conversation on Twitter with #InsideIran.

This event will feature the following speakers:

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Q&A: Nuclear Deal Will Boost President Rouhani

Yesterday’s announced framework for a deal on Iran’s nuclear program will limit Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for an end to international economic sanctions against the country. Many experts, including USIP’s Daniel Brumberg, have offered analysis of the agreement’s details, including its chances of preventing Iran from reaching a nuclear-weapons capability. Less attention has focused on the meaning of the accord for Iran and its place in the world. USIP expert and author Robin Wright says the accord and its promise to ease Iran’s deep economic crisis will boost Iran’s centrist president, Hassan Rouhani. He has said he sees it as a first step to re-integrating Iran in international relations.

What does a nuclear deal mean for Iran?

USIP Staff
Fri, 04/03/2015 - 15:33
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Q&A: In Principle, a Nuclear Agreement with Iran?

Iran has agreed with six major powers—the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council plus Germany—to limit its nuclear activities for at least a decade in exchange for an end to international economic sanctions. This agreement on principles, announced yesterday, is incomplete. More talks will be needed to decide numerous technical details, including the pace at which sanctions will be lifted. As USIP’s Robin Wright explores the ramifications of the agreement for Iran’s place in the world, USIP Special Advisor on Iran Daniel Brumberg discusses the implications of the announced accord, including the opposition to it from Israel and from many in the U.S. Congress.

President Obama has called this agreement “historic;” Secretary of State Kerry says it’s a “milestone.” Are they correct?

USIP Staff
Fri, 04/03/2015 - 15:19
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Politics of a Nuclear Deal: Former U.S. & Iranian Officials Debate

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 09:30
Mon, 04/20/2015 - 11:00
Subtitle: 
An Iran Forum Series Event

Iran and the world’s six major powers now face a June 30 deadline for converting a blueprint into a final nuclear deal. A unique panel of former U.S. and Iranian officials will assess the status of the talks and the political dynamics that will determine the fate of any agreement in Washington and Tehran. Join us for the discussion on April 20 at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

This event is the fourth in the Iran Forum series hosted by a coalition of eight think tanks, including USIP, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, RAND, the Arms Control Association, the Center for a New American Security, the Stimson Center, Partnership for a Secure America, and the Ploughshares Fund. Join the conversation on Twitter with #IranDeal.

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China Has Peaked as a Challenger to U.S. Power, Former Secretary of State Shultz Says

While China continues to grow as an economy and a military and political power, its overall influence relative to the United States has passed its peak, former Secretary of State George Shultz said at the U.S. Institute of Peace January 30. As China’s population ages, fewer working-age people must support a larger aged and dependent populace. “I think China, in relation to the U.S., has already reached its peak,” Shultz said in offering the Institute’s annual Dean Acheson Lecture.

'The reality is you have to conduct a global diplomacy—the United States does. You have to be everywhere.' --George Shultz

James Rupert
Mon, 02/09/2015 - 09:28
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Managing Conflict in a World Adrift

In the midst of a political shift where power is moving from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking are changing. "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift" provides a sobering panorama of contemporary conflict, along with innovative thinking about how to respond now that new forces and dynamics are at play.

"Managing Conflict in a World Adrift," the fourth volume in the landmark series edited by Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall, is the follow-on to "Leashing the Dogs of War," the definitive text on the sources of conflict and solutions for preventing and managing conflict. Forty of the most influential analysts of international affairs present varied perspectives and insightful thinking to inform a new framework for understanding current demands of conflict management.

Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall editors
Wed, 02/04/2015 - 12:40

The Current Situation in Iran

Hassan Rouhani’s upset victory in the June 2013 presidential election created great expectations of change. The new centrist president pledged to resolve the nuclear dispute, improve Iran’s relations with the outside world, revitalize the economy, and encourage a more open society. In April 2015, the Islamic Republic and the world’s major powers agreed on a blueprint to prevent Tehran from getting a bomb in exchange for sanctions relief. Rouhani needs a foreign policy success to implement his domestic agenda.

USIP’s Work

USIP conducts research and policy analysis on major developments in Iran. USIP experts also provide regular briefings for Members of Congress and staff and for officials at the Department of State and other branches of the U.S. government. USIP’s recent work includes:

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 11:13
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Q&A: Iran Nuclear Talks

Talks between Iran and six major powers—the U.S., the U.K., China, France, Germany and Russia—seek a framework agreement by March 24 with technical details by June. But leaders on all sides face intense—and sometimes harrowing—domestic pressure from opponents who fear a final agreement will give away too much. Robin Wright, an author and distinguished fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace, explores the dynamics of the diplomacy.

Peace Predictions: USIP Experts Consider the Year Ahead

Fri, 01/30/2015 - 11:11
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The United States Will Never Win the Propaganda War Against the Islamic State

To win hearts and minds in the Middle East, America needs to let local allies do the talking.

When Ndugwa Hassan joined his friends on July 11, 2010, at the Kyadondo Rugby Club in Kampala, Uganda, he did not know his life was about to change forever. He was there to watch the World Cup final between the Netherlands and Spain, which was being broadcast from Johannesburg; white chairs covered the rugby pitch where the crowd viewed the two teams on a giant screen.

Manal Omar
Mon, 01/12/2015 - 10:42
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Articles & Analysis

Yesterday’s announced framework for a deal on Iran’s nuclear program will limit Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for an end to international economic sanctions against the country. Many...

By:
USIP Staff

Iran has agreed with six major powers—the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council plus Germany—to limit its nuclear activities for at least a decade in exchange for an end to...

By:
USIP Staff

While China continues to grow as an economy and a military and political power, its overall influence relative to the United States has passed its peak, former Secretary of State George Shultz...

By:
James Rupert

Videos & Webcasts

While China continues to grow as an economy and a military and political power, its overall influence relative to the United States has passed its peak, former Secretary of State George Shultz...

The last event in our three-part series addressed the complex questions and challenges of sanctions in the Iran nuclear talks.

Two long-time Middle East experts have recently returned from Iran. Their discussions with cabinet members, ayatollahs, hardliners, Members of Parliament, economists, opposition figures and...

Learn More

Publications

In the midst of a political shift where power is moving from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking...
By:
USIP Staff
Hassan Rouhani’s upset victory in the June 2013 presidential election created great expectations of change. The new centrist president pledged to resolve the nuclear dispute, improve Iran’s relations...