Guatemala

Acclaimed Iraqi Women’s Rights Lawyer Pleads, 'Please Don’t Forget Iraq'

A poignant plea from a prominent Iraqi lawyer who was lauded this week for her community leadership illustrated the determination it takes to achieve change in the most daunting circumstances. “Please, don’t forget Iraq,” Suaad Allami told an audience at the U.S. Institute of Peace, just hours before President Barack Obama announced plans to send 300 military advisers to support her country’s security forces amid the current crisis.

Allami is one of five recipients of the Global Leadership Awards from Vital Voices Global Partnership, a U.S. nonprofit organization that identifies, trains and helps strengthen emerging women leaders and social entrepreneurs around the globe. The awards ceremony at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts recognized the women for their work to strengthen democracy, increase economic opportunity and protect human rights. The other recipients hailed from Syria, Guatemala, Tanzania and India.

Viola Gienger
Fri, 06/20/2014 - 11:56
Type of Article: 

Global Innovators: Women Leading Change Around the World

Thu, 06/19/2014 - 09:00
Thu, 06/19/2014 - 11:00

The U.S. Institute of Peace in partnership with the Vital Voices Global Partnership and the Bernstein Family Foundation hosted a panel event featuring the 2014 Vital Voices Global Leadership Awards Honorees on Thursday, June 19th from 9:00 am to 11:00am. 

Read the event analysis, Acclaimed Iraqi Women’s Rights Lawyer Pleads, 'Please Don’t Forget Iraq'

The U.S. Institute of Peace in partnership with the Vital Voices Global Partnership and the Bernstein Family Foundation hosted a panel event featuring the 2014 Vital Voices Global Leadership Awards Honorees on Thursday, June 19th from 9:00 am to 11:00am.  These annual awards honor women leaders who are breaking barriers and building innovative solutions to achieve economic, social and political change around the world.

Type of Event or Course: 

Sharon Morris

Sharon
Morris
Former Senior Advisor to the Acting President

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Note: This is an archived profile of a former U.S. Institute of Peace expert. The information is current as of the dates of tenure.

Role: 

Introduction to Interfaith Conflict Resolution

Thu, 01/16/2014 (All day)
Wed, 12/31/2014 - 23:59

This introductory course demonstrates how principles of interfaith conflict resolution have been applied in international conflict settings.

Experts: 

Newcomers to this subject, whether international professionals or the general public, will learn how religious actors have helped play an important role in persuading official political leaders to pursue paths of peace.

Introduction to Interfaith Conflict Resolution examines two case studies, highlighting interfaith peacemaking efforts between Christians and Muslims in Nigeria, as well as the role that various faith communities played in helping to bring and end to the 36-year internal armed conflict in Guatemala.

Type of Event or Course: 
Countries: 

Peacekeeping without Guns

Experts on nonviolent peacekeeping presented their methodologies, lessons learned, and the way forward for the innovative field at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on March 21, 2012.

Steven Ruder

Experts on nonviolent peacekeeping presented their methodologies, lessons learned, and the way forward for the innovative field at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on March 21, 2012.

Wed, 03/21/2012 - 16:34
Type of Article: 

Empowering Local Peacebuilders

Peacebuilding operations in conflict and post-conflict societies often undermine local capacity, ownership, and sustainability. The acknowledged remedy is to empower local actors to take the lead in planning and implementing programs, but few empowerment strategies that work in practice have been documented and explained.

Summary

Problem Identified

  • Peacebuilding operations in conflict and post-conflict societies often undermine local capacity, ownership, and sustainability. The acknowledged remedy is to empower local actors to take the lead in planning and implementing programs, but few empowerment strategies that work in practice have been documented and explained.

Action Taken

Wed, 03/21/2012 - 10:12
Type of Article: 

Book Launch: Customary Justice and Rule of Law in War-Torn Societies

Thu, 01/12/2012 - 09:30
Thu, 01/12/2012 - 11:00
Public Event

Customary Justice and Rule of Law in War-Torn Societies presents seven in-depth case studies that take a broad interdisciplinary approach to the study of the justice system.  USIP brought together policymakers and practitioners to discuss the ways in which recent rule of law innovations plays a role in resolving many justice reform issues.

Read the event coverage, Customary Law Plays Critical Role in Countries in Conflict, Experts Say

United States Institute of Peace
2301 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20037

Inquiries

If you have any questions about this event, please contact Vijay Simhan at vsimhan@usip.org.

Experts: 
Type of Event or Course: 

Truth Commission: Guatemala

Truth Commission: Commission for Historical Clarification
Duration: 1997 – 1999
Charter: Agreement on the establishment of the Commission to clarify past human rights violations and acts of violence that have caused the Guatemalan population to suffer, June 23, 1994
Commissioners: 3
Report: Public report

 

Truth Commission: Commission for Historical Clarification (Comisión para el Esclarecimiento Histórico)

Dates of Operation: February 1997 - February 1999 (2 years)

Sat, 02/01/1997 - 09:00
Issue Areas: 
Type of Article: 

Customary Justice Systems Play an Important Role in Postconflict Justice Strategies

In a new volume, “Customary Justice and the Rule of Law in War-Torn Societies” from the United States Institute of Peace, editor Deborah Isser argues that measuring customary justice systems against Western rule-of-law templates leads to strategies that fail to address the concerns of the population and impedes access to justice.

In a new volume, “Customary Justice and the Rule of Law in War-Torn Societies” from the United States Institute of Peace, editor Deborah Isser argues that measuring customary justice systems against Western rule-of-law templates leads to strategies that fail to address the concerns of the population and impedes access to justice.

Sat, 07/30/2011 - 17:01
Type of Article: 
Issue Areas: 

Articles & Analysis

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Experts on nonviolent peacekeeping presented their methodologies, lessons learned, and the way forward for the innovative field at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on March 21, 2012.

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Videos & Webcasts

The U.S. Institute of Peace in partnership with the Vital Voices Global Partnership and the Bernstein Family Foundation hosted a panel event featuring the 2014 Vital Voices Global Leadership...

Learn More

Publications

Peacebuilding operations in conflict and post-conflict societies often undermine local capacity, ownership, and sustainability. The acknowledged remedy is to empower local actors to take the lead in...
By:
Deborah Isser, editor
Customary Justice and the Rule of Law in War-Torn Societies presents seven in-depth case studies that take a broad interdisciplinary approach to the study of the justice system. Moving beyond the...