France

France plays an influential global role as a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, NATO, the G-8, the G-20, the EU and other multilateral organizations. France rejoined NATO's integrated military command structure in 2009, reversing de Gaulle's 1966 decision to take French forces out of NATO. Since 1958, it has constructed a hybrid presidential-parliamentary governing system resistant to the instabilities experienced in earlier, more purely parliamentary administrations. In recent decades, its reconciliation and cooperation with Germany have proved central to the economic integration of Europe, including the introduction of a common currency, the euro, in January 1999. In the early 21st century, five French overseas entities - French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayotte, and Reunion - became French regions and were made part of France proper.

NATO’s Balancing Act

NATO's Balancing Act evaluates the alliance’s performance of its three core tasks—collective defense, crisis management, and cooperative security—and reviews its members’ efforts to achieve the right balance among them. Yost considers NATO's role in the evolving global security environment and its implications for collective defense and crisis management in the Balkans, Afghanistan, Africa, Libya, and elsewhere.

Available July 2014

“After the acclaimed NATO Transformed, David Yost's NATO's Balancing Act demonstrates once again why the author ranks among the leading experts in his field: those who want to understand NATO's internal and external challenges will not find a more thorough analysis.”
—Michael Rühle, Emerging Security Challenges Division, NATO

Fri, 01/17/2014 - 16:07

Iran Agreement Sets Agenda for Talks Toward Larger Pact

The agreement delineates a plan for real, cooperative activities that achieve initial goals for each side: some of the sanctions relief sought by Iran, and Tehran’s freeze on nuclear progress sought by the P5+1 group (made up of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council – the U.S., U.K., France, Russia and China, plus Germany).

How Will France’s Surprise Intervention in Mali Affect a Longer-Term Solution?

France’s military intervention in Mali will fundamentally alter the dynamics of the Malian crisis and the role of the international community in seeking a solution. While that might sound like stating the obvious, it’s important to emphasize the dramatic effect of this military action on the potential for long-term peace and stability.

Tobias Koepf

Tobias
Koepf
Former TAPIR Fellow

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Project Focus: France and the EU as Security Actors in Africa

Note: This is an archived profile of a former U.S. Institute of Peace expert. The information is current as of the dates of tenure.

Former USIP Fellows Help Foster Basque Peace Breakthrough

When they met during their fellowships at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) in 2005, a lasting friendship was born. But as Pierre Hazan, a Swiss political scientist and former journalist, got to know Gorka Espiau Idoiaga, a peace activist from the Basque country of Spain, they had no idea that their friendship would bring them back together years later to help foster a breakthrough for peace in Western Europe’s last guerrilla conflict.

Thomas Omestad

When they met during their fellowships at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) in 2005, a lasting friendship was born. But as Pierre Hazan, a Swiss political scientist and former journalist, got to know Gorka Espiau Idoiaga, a peace activist from the Basque country of Spain, they had no idea that their friendship would bring them back together years later to help foster a breakthrough for peace in Western Europe’s last guerrilla conflict.

Wed, 12/21/2011 - 15:07
Type of Article: 
Countries: 

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Today: An Introduction

Tue, 01/17/2012 - 09:30
Fri, 01/20/2012 - 16:30

This course will provide the nonspecialist with a concise overview of the major building blocks of arms control and nuclear nonproliferation policy as well as current and emerging issues that the world will confront in the coming years.

 

 


Nuclear Arms Control: An In-Depth Look at its Role in Security

This course provides students and practitioners with a balanced, in-depth look at the objectives and evolution of strategic arms control, challenges and potential avenues for a New START follow-on, and other related issues, including implications for U.S. nuclear policy, deterrence and extended deterrence, missile defense, strategic conventional strike, space- and cyber-security, and the nuclear zero issue.  Simulations and small group discussions further enhance the learning experience.
 

Nuclear issues permeate many facets of contemporary international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and regional studies.  While the threat of a large-scale nuclear exchange decreased significantly with the end of the Cold war, the challenges of strategic stability and deterrence remain prominent in an increasingly complex and globalized world.

Type of Event or Course: 

21st Century Issues in Strategic Arms Control and Nuclear Nonproliferation

Tue, 04/12/2011 - 18:00
Tue, 05/24/2011 - 20:00
Public Event

This course has been postponed until further notice.  Please stay tuned for updates to the schedule.

This course will provide the non-specialist with a concise overview of the major building blocks of arms control and nuclear nonproliferation policy as well as current and emerging issues that the world will confront in the coming years. Students will develop critical analytical skills in assessing arms control and nonproliferation issues and a better understanding of their broader impact. Several exercises and group discussions will allow students to sharpen their understanding and analytical skills.

Note: This course has been postponed until further notice.  We apologize for any inconvenience.  Please stay tuned for updates to the schedule.

Registration is open to the public, but the course is only available to those who apply and are accepted.

U.S. Institute of Peace
2301 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20037

Inquiries

Please contact Brian Rose at brose@usip.org or 202-429-3812 with any questions about this course. More general questions about the USIP Academy may be directed to academy@usip.org.

Topics

  • How nuclear weapons work, the principles of deterrence and nuclear strategy, and why states choose to pursue nuclear weapons
  • The goals of arms control, how arms control treaties are negotiated, and future prospects for the arms control process
  • The structure, purpose and process of the nuclear nonproliferation regime, including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
  • Challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including “bad actors,” non-NPT nuclear weapons states, and approaches to countering proliferation
  • Challenges of transitioning to a denuclearized world, including nuclear terrorism and materials security, deterrence and security at low levels of nuclear weapons, and other special topics

Exercises

Dealing with the Iranian Nuclear Threat
Iran is one of the most widely discussed cases in nonproliferation today. Ambiguity surrounding the Iranian nuclear program, which Iran argues is for peaceful purposes, is of considerable concern to the United States and its allies. In addition, many Arab states in the region fear the possibility of an Iranian nuclear weapons program. Students will be asked to analyze and discuss the impact of possible developments in the Iranian nuclear program in a simulated crisis environment.

Third Party Deployment of a Missile Defense System
Missile defense is a prominent issue in debates on U.S. nuclear strategy and arms control. However, much of the discussion is solely focused on international responses to developments in U.S. missile defense programs. This exercise asks participants to examine the development of a ballistic missile defense system by a third party in a scenario that mixes analysis with simulated reporting to senior U.S. officials.

Type of Event or Course: 

21st Century Issues in Strategic Arms Control and Nuclear Nonproliferation

Mon, 02/14/2011 - 09:00
Fri, 02/18/2011 - 16:30
Invitational Event

Nuclear issues, including strategic arms control and nuclear nonproliferation, permeate many facets of contemporary international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and regional studies. This course will provide the student with a concise overview of the major building blocks of arms control and nuclear nonproliferation policy as well as current and emerging issues that the world will confront in the coming years.

Note: Registration is open to the public, but the course is only available to those who apply and are accepted.

Nuclear issues, including strategic arms control and nuclear nonproliferation, permeate many facets of contemporary international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and regional studies. While the threat of a large-scale nuclear exchange decreased significantly with the end of the Cold War, the challenges of strategic stability, deterrence, nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism remain prominent in an increasingly complex and globalized world. 

United States Institute of Peace
2nd Floor Academy Room
1200 17th St, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036

Inquiries

For further information, please contact Academy staff by e-mail at academy@usip.org or Brian Rose at brose@usip.org.

Topics 

  • How nuclear weapons work, the principles of deterrence and nuclear strategy, and why states choose to pursue nuclear weapons
  • The goals of arms control, how arms control treaties are negotiated, and future prospects for the arms control process
  • The structure, purpose and process of the nuclear nonproliferation regime, including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
  • Challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including “bad actors,” non-NPT nuclear weapons states, and approaches to countering proliferation
  • Challenges of transitioning to a denuclearized world, including nuclear terrorism and materials security, deterrence and security at low levels of nuclear weapons, and other special topics

Exercises

Dealing with the Iranian Nuclear Threat
Iran is one of the most widely discussed cases in nonproliferation today. Ambiguity surrounding the Iranian nuclear program, which Iran argues is for peaceful purposes, is of considerable concern to the United States and its allies. In addition, many Arab states in the region fear the possibility of an Iranian nuclear weapons program. Students will be asked to analyze and discuss the impact of possible developments in the Iranian nuclear program in a simulated crisis environment. 

Third Party Deployment of a Missile Defense System
Missile defense is a prominent issue in debates on U.S. nuclear strategy and arms control. However, much of the discussion is solely focused on international responses to developments in U.S. missile defense programs. This exercise asks participants to examine the development of a ballistic missile defense system by a third party in a scenario that mixes analysis with simulated reporting to senior U.S. officials.

Type of Event or Course: 

On the Issues: Iran and P5+1 Talks

USIP expert Dan Brumberg previews the upcoming talks with Iran and provides background on the current situation.

January 18, 2011

USIP expert Dan Brumberg previews the upcoming P5 +1 talks with Iran and provides background on the current situation.

Dan Brumberg
Tue, 01/18/2011 - 12:23
Type of Article: 

Articles & Analysis

November 25, 2013

The agreement with Iran penned in Geneva is a significant step because it creates an agenda for cooperative and reciprocal action between Iran and its powerful foes that has not existed before. Without such a deal – even one as short-lived as this six-month framework – no larger agreement is really possible.

Our Work in the Field

Learn More

Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Bruce MacDonald

This course provides students and practitioners with a balanced, in-depth look at the objectives and evolution of strategic arms control, challenges and potential avenues for a New START follow-on, and other related issues, including implications for U.S. nuclear policy, deterrence and extended deterrence, missile defense, strategic conventional strike, space- and cyber-security, and the nuclear zero issue.  Simulations and small group discussions further enhance the learning experience.
 

Nuclear issues permeate many facets of contemporary international relations, U.S.

Publications

By:
USIP Staff
NATO's Balancing Act evaluates the alliance’s performance of its three core tasks—collective defense, crisis management, and cooperative security—and reviews its members’ efforts to achieve the right balance among them. Yost considers NATO's role in the evolving global security environment and its implications for collective defense and crisis management in the Balkans, Afghanistan, Africa, Libya, and elsewhere.
By:
Thomas Omestad
When they met during their fellowships at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) in 2005, a lasting friendship was born. But as Pierre Hazan, a Swiss political scientist and former journalist, got to know Gorka Espiau Idoiaga, a peace activist from the Basque country of Spain, they had no idea that their friendship would bring them back together years later to help foster a breakthrough for peace in Western Europe’s last guerrilla conflict.