Egypt

USIP’s goal in Egypt, and in the broader Arab world where similar struggles are now unfolding, is to assist contending groups define practical legal, institutional and constitutional solutions that will promote peaceful democratic change and conflict resolution.

Water Security and Conflict Prevention Summit

Tue, 09/10/2013 - 08:30
Tue, 09/10/2013 - 14:00

On September 10, 2013, U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), the Association of the United States Army (AUSA), and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) hosted a summit on the growing concerns in water security and the risks for increased conflict.

Water is an undeniable, un-substitutable, and powerful factor in everyone’s life, from sustaining individual lives to defining both economic and social policies and practices. As populations and demand expand while supplies decline, access to water will become increasingly difficult, raising the prospects for conflict over this precious resource. By 2025, experts estimated that 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions of absolute water scarcity.

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Current Challenges to Christian-Muslim Relations in Egypt

Fri, 06/14/2013 - 10:00
Fri, 06/14/2013 - 12:00

On Friday, June 14, two Egyptian religious leaders, Grand Mufti Mohamed Ali Goma’a and Bishop Mouneer Hanna Anis, discussed the challenges their communities face in the democratic transition of their state.

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After decades of authoritarian rule, Egypt’s transition to democracy is tackled incredible challenges including political, social and economic reform, infrastructural development, and the ongoing religious sectarianism.

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Lessons Learned from Iraq and How They Apply to North Africa

Tue, 04/09/2013 - 10:00
Tue, 04/09/2013 - 12:00

The event highlighted the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR) experience in Iraq and examined the major problems it discovered, such as America’s “ad hoc” approach, the effectiveness of oversight, funding challenges, and the larger issue of nation-building. Experts explored how lessons learned from Iraq could be applied to other American-led efforts, such as those associated with emerging democracies.

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Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR) Stuart Bowen on March 6 released SIGIR’s final report for Congress, “Learning From Iraq,” which details the accomplishments of the U.S. reconstruction efforts in Iraq. The report provides an “instructive picture of what was the largest stabilization and reconstruction operation ever undertaken by the United States (until recently overtaken by Afghanistan)."  Additionally, the report outlines seven lessons that the U.S. should implement to improve its approach to future stabilization and reconstruction operations.

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Egyptian President Resigns after Peaceful Protests

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has resigned on Feb. 11 after weeks of peaceful protests. USIP takes a comprehensive look at the situation and its implications.

 

UPDATED: February 15, 2011

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned on Feb. 11 after weeks of peaceful protests. USIP takes a comprehensive look at the situation and its implications.

Thu, 02/03/2011 - 14:35
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Aid to Civil Society: A Movement Mindset

Fri, 03/06/2015 - 14:00
Fri, 03/06/2015 - 15:30

People worldwide have been stirred by the dramatic images of “people power” movements calling for democracy and economic justice. The U.S. Institute of Peace invites you to a panel discussion on Friday, March 6, on strategies for governments and non-government supporters to lend backing to movements for social change.

In Hong Kong and Malaysia, Ukraine and Egypt, Brazil, Venezuela and elsewhere, throngs of citizenry  have challenged their governments over corruption, political repression, discrimination, and other scourges.

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Managing Conflict in a World Adrift

In the midst of a political shift where power is moving from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking are changing. "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift" provides a sobering panorama of contemporary conflict, along with innovative thinking about how to respond now that new forces and dynamics are at play.

"Managing Conflict in a World Adrift," the fourth volume in the landmark series edited by Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall, is the follow-on to "Leashing the Dogs of War," the definitive text on the sources of conflict and solutions for preventing and managing conflict. Forty of the most influential analysts of international affairs present varied perspectives and insightful thinking to inform a new framework for understanding current demands of conflict management.

Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall editors
Wed, 02/04/2015 - 12:40

Participatory and Inclusive Constitution-Making

In the wake of the Arab Spring, citizens across the Middle East and North Africa are demanding reforms from their governments. How these governments respond to their people and promote inclusive constitution-making processes may determine whether their new social compacts lead to a durable peace. This report draws from the work of scholars and constitution makers who have been exchanging ideas about how to ensure that modern constitutions incorporate the needs and aspirations of the citizens they are intended to govern. As the countries of the Arab Spring transition from authoritarian regimes and overcome ethnic and sectarian divisions, they can learn lessons from comparative constitution-making experiences—including most recently that of Tunisia—about how to achieve more consensus based social compacts and lasting peace.

Jason Gluck and Michele Brandt

Summary

  • Many of the countries of the Arab Spring face daunting challenges. Syria is racked by war. Libya’s transition is challenged by armed militias vying for control. In Egypt, the early promise of popular transformation has reinforced divisions in society. Jordan and Morocco have taken steps toward reform, but it is still unclear whether these countries can meet the demands of their citizens. It is also unclear to what extent Yemen’s mediated transition and ongoing constitution-making process will lead to a more stable and democratic society.
Thu, 01/29/2015 - 15:02

Confronting Repression: Donors, Civic Groups Brainstorm Solutions

A Filipino activist fighting human trafficking, a member of a watchdog group in Uruguay, an Egyptian peacebuilder, an anti-corruption campaigner from Ghana, a Dutch freedom-of-expression activist and an American tech- and civic-engagement guru – these are just a few of 47 civic leaders who met in Turkey this month to discuss ways of supporting civil society in an era of increasing government repression.

Maria J. Stephan

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida) gathered us in a make-shift classroom in central Istanbul to brainstorm innovations that could help active citizens defend and reclaim civic space.

Tue, 11/25/2014 - 11:18
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Music Plays Crucial Role in Non-Violent Civic Movements

For hundreds of years, music has been integral to rebellion, resistance and revolution. USIP is highlighting the power of a melody to inspire alternatives to violence. Music and the arts are strategic tools of non-violent action and need to be financed as such, says USIP Senior Policy Fellow Maria Stephan, one of the world's leading scholars on strategic nonviolent action, in a new audio podcast.

The Crowd Who Would Be King

Technology is connecting people all over the world, giving them new power and a stronger voice. But is it making government any better?

Sheldon Himelfarb

If there is one word that has been on everyone's lips during the political crises in Iraq, Ukraine, and Afghanistan, it is "inclusive." Heads of state, foreign secretaries, and even military chiefs like NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen have made head

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 16:18
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Articles & Analysis

A Filipino activist fighting human trafficking, a member of a watchdog group in Uruguay, an Egyptian peacebuilder, an anti-corruption campaigner from Ghana, a Dutch freedom-of-expression activist...

By:
Maria J. Stephan

In Libya’s 2011 uprising, protesters pumped loud music from radios or CD players in the streets in front of government buildings, then fled from the inevitable rush of security forces. The...

By:
Viola Gienger

Technology is connecting people all over the world, giving them new power and a stronger voice. But is it making government any better?

By:
Sheldon Himelfarb

Videos & Webcasts

USIP and the Conflict Prevention & Resolution Forum presented an exciting new movie and corresponding panel discussion on the intersection between music and nonviolent civic action.

In this half-day conference, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the George Washington University’s Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication hosted two panels of experts on social media...

The United States Institute of Peace hosted H.E. Mr. Mohamed M. Tawfik, Egyptian Ambassador to the United States, for public remarks and discussion. The Ambassador discussed Egypt-U.S. relations,...

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Publications

In the midst of a political shift where power is moving from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking...
In the wake of the Arab Spring, citizens across the Middle East and North Africa are demanding reforms from their governments. How these governments respond to their people and promote inclusive...