Egypt

USIP’s goal in Egypt, and in the broader Arab world where similar struggles are now unfolding, is to assist contending groups define practical legal, institutional and constitutional solutions that will promote peaceful democratic change and conflict resolution.

Water Security and Conflict Prevention Summit

Tue, 09/10/2013 - 08:30
Tue, 09/10/2013 - 14:00

On September 10, 2013, U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), the Association of the United States Army (AUSA), and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) hosted a summit on the growing concerns in water security and the risks for increased conflict.

Water is an undeniable, un-substitutable, and powerful factor in everyone’s life, from sustaining individual lives to defining both economic and social policies and practices. As populations and demand expand while supplies decline, access to water will become increasingly difficult, raising the prospects for conflict over this precious resource. By 2025, experts estimated that 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions of absolute water scarcity.

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Current Challenges to Christian-Muslim Relations in Egypt

Fri, 06/14/2013 - 10:00
Fri, 06/14/2013 - 12:00

On Friday, June 14, two Egyptian religious leaders, Grand Mufti Mohamed Ali Goma’a and Bishop Mouneer Hanna Anis, discussed the challenges their communities face in the democratic transition of their state.

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After decades of authoritarian rule, Egypt’s transition to democracy is tackled incredible challenges including political, social and economic reform, infrastructural development, and the ongoing religious sectarianism.

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Lessons Learned from Iraq and How They Apply to North Africa

Tue, 04/09/2013 - 10:00
Tue, 04/09/2013 - 12:00

The event highlighted the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR) experience in Iraq and examined the major problems it discovered, such as America’s “ad hoc” approach, the effectiveness of oversight, funding challenges, and the larger issue of nation-building. Experts explored how lessons learned from Iraq could be applied to other American-led efforts, such as those associated with emerging democracies.

Experts: 

Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR) Stuart Bowen on March 6 released SIGIR’s final report for Congress, “Learning From Iraq,” which details the accomplishments of the U.S. reconstruction efforts in Iraq. The report provides an “instructive picture of what was the largest stabilization and reconstruction operation ever undertaken by the United States (until recently overtaken by Afghanistan)."  Additionally, the report outlines seven lessons that the U.S. should implement to improve its approach to future stabilization and reconstruction operations.

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Egyptian President Resigns after Peaceful Protests

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has resigned on Feb. 11 after weeks of peaceful protests. USIP takes a comprehensive look at the situation and its implications.

 

UPDATED: February 15, 2011

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned on Feb. 11 after weeks of peaceful protests. USIP takes a comprehensive look at the situation and its implications.

Thu, 02/03/2011 - 14:35
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Working Effectively with Interpreters

The success of a project or mission in a cross-cultural, multilingual environment often depends upon effective communication with an audience or local counterpart. Interpreters play a critical role in bridging language and cultural divides, but that depends upon your ability to work with them effectively. Failed interpretation of an important message or concept can easily lead to miscommunication, embarrassment, strained relationships, or even danger. This course offers practical tips to work effectively with interpreters.

Leanne McKay

Leanne
McKay
Senior Program Officer, Rule of Law Center

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Leanne McKay is a senior program officer with Rule of Law in the Center for Governance, Law and Society at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Her work focuses on engaging government and civil society representatives on the promotion of the rule of law in countries transitioning from conflict.

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Twitter Evolutions: The Changing Role of Social Media in War and Protest

Mon, 02/24/2014 - 09:00
Mon, 02/24/2014 - 13:00

In this half-day conference, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the George Washington University’s Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication hosted two panels of experts on social media’s role in political protest and civil war across the Middle East and Europe as part of a discussion on the latest Blogs and Bullets report: Syria’s Socially Mediated War.

9:00am to 9:10am | Introduction

  • Sheldon Himelfarb
    Director of Media, Technology, and Peacebuilding, U.S. Institute of Peace

9:10am to 10:30am | Panel I: Syria’s Socially Mediated Civil War

  • P.J. Crowley, Moderator
    Professor of Practice, School of Media and Public Affairs, George Washington University. Former Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs
  • Marc Lynch
    Director, Institute for Middle East Studies, George Washington University
  • Sean Aday
    Director, Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication, George Washington University
  • Deen Freelon
    Assistant Professor of Communications Studies, American University

10:30am to 10:45am | Break

10:45am to 12:30pm | Panel II: New Media and Contentious Politics in Egypt, Ukraine and Turkey

  • P.J. Crowley, Moderator
    Professor of Practice, School of Media and Public Affairs, George Washington University. Former Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs
  • Adel Iskandar
    Adjunct Instructor, Communication, Culture & Technology, Georgetown University
  • Joshua Tucker
    Professor of Politics, New York University
  • Zeynep Tufecki
    Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

In the early days of the Arab Spring, many hailed digital media as revolutionary tools for democracy and peacebuilding. Three years later, as the region still struggles with authoritarian retrenchment and civil war, social media continues to play an important, if far more complex, role in ongoing events. Meanwhile, protest movements in parts of Europe – especially Turkey and Ukraine – are providing intriguing, and complicated, examples of digitally-active protest movements and recalcitrant governments.

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Osama Gharizi

Osama
Gharizi
Program Officer, Learning & Evaluation

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Osama Gharizi joined USIP as program officer for Learning and Evaluation in August 2013. He previously worked at the International Republican Institute (IRI) where he designed, managed and evaluated programs on governance, political party and civil society strengthening, and election observation. His time at IRI included directing survey research programs in Lebanon, managing monitoring and evaluation efforts in Egypt and leading IRI’s long-term election observation for the 2012 parliamentary elections in Georgia. He also worked on projects in Oman, Morocco and Jordan.

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Darine El Hage

Darine
El Hage
Regional Program Officer, Center for Middle East and Africa

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Darine El Hage is a regional program officer in USIP’s Center for Middle East and Africa based in Beirut, Lebanon. El Hage trains, mentors, and advises on organizational development, international human rights, refugee protection, humanitarian law, and NGO capacity-building related themes. Prior to joining USIP, El Hage was working for the Center for Victims of Torture (CVT) on its New Tactics in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) Initiative, a capacity-building program for local human rights organizations in Egypt and Tunisia in human rights advocacy.

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Articles & Analysis

January 16, 2014
For more information on Egypt from USIP, click here. For Omar’s reflections on the referendum, see her analysis on the website of Foreign Policy magazine.

Our Work in the Field

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Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Debra Liang-Fenton, Linda Bishai, Dorina Bekoe, Jacqueline H. Wilson

This course will be offered again in the Fall of 2014

Stemming electoral violence in transition and fragile environments requires understanding the broader landscape of the conflict and how that conflict is managed. With important elections in Africa on the horizon in 2014 and 2015, this course will examine specific examples from cases across Africa in order to analyze how electoral violence was prevented or mitigated through effective strategic planning and policymaking.

"The popular U.S.

Online Courses

Instructor:
December 11, 2013

This course is designed for international professionals who wish to improve their communication skills when working with an interpreter in a cross-cultural context.

The success of a project or mission in a cross-cultural, multilingual environment often depends upon effective communication with an audience or local counterpart.
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Publications

CAIRO — The first day of a much-hyped constitutional referendum confirmed two things that most Egyptians already knew. First, this third referendum in as many years has little to do with the actual document being voted on. And second, there is virtually no question of what the result will be: The constitution will pass by a landslide.
By:
Viola Gienger
Egyptian Ambassador to the U.S. Mohamed M. Tawfik pledged that his interim government would increase public discussion about a revised constitution in the coming weeks as a 50-member commission finalizes a draft for a planned referendum in December. But amid violence, polarization and intimidation, the co-founder of a civic movement said the interim regime has failed to deliver its promised dialogue.