Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo needs help to build governmental capacity, strong governmental institutions, human rights and womens' rights in particular, in order for any reconciliation and rebuilding to take hold after the violence stops.

Peace Prospects in the Great Lakes

Thu, 02/20/2014 - 13:00
Thu, 02/20/2014 - 14:30
Subtitle: 
A Discussion with U.S. Special Envoy Russell D. Feingold

USIP and U.S. Special Envoy Russ Feingold discussed the prospects for peace in the Great Lakes region of Africa on February 20th.

Experts: 

Africa's Great Lakes region has been a violent and unstable for years. April marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide resulted in the deaths of half a million people in 100 days. Conflict in neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo alone has displaced or killed more than 5 million residents in the past two decades, making it the deadliest war in Africa’s modern history. The region is challenged by ethnic tensions, the exploitation of resources, the continued use of child soldiers, dozens of armed rebel armed groups, and violence against women. Russ Feingold, the U.S.

Type of Event or Course: 

Conflict, Challenges, and Prospects in the Congo: A Diplomat’s Perspective

Wed, 12/11/2013 - 14:00
Wed, 12/11/2013 - 15:30

Ambassador Roger Meece shared his perspectives on the Democratic Republic of Congo's recent history, current developments and what may lie ahead.

  • Ambassador Johnnie Carson, Opening Remarks and Moderator
    Special Advisor to the President, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • The Honorable Ambassador Roger Meece, Keynote Remarks
    Former SRSG to the Democratic Republic of Congo

Parts of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) have been in conflict for nearly two decades. During that time, an estimated 5 million people have been killed. Tens of thousands have been uprooted and driven from their homes. Thousands of women and girls have been brutally raped. Congo is an ongoing humanitarian tragedy, especially for women. Prolonged instability has resulted in serious cross-border conflicts and the establishment of one of the world’s largest and longest-running United Nations peacekeeping missions.

Experts: 
Type of Event or Course: 

Water Security and Conflict Prevention Summit

Tue, 09/10/2013 - 08:30
Tue, 09/10/2013 - 14:00

On September 10, 2013, U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), the Association of the United States Army (AUSA), and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) hosted a summit on the growing concerns in water security and the risks for increased conflict.

Water is an undeniable, un-substitutable, and powerful factor in everyone’s life, from sustaining individual lives to defining both economic and social policies and practices. As populations and demand expand while supplies decline, access to water will become increasingly difficult, raising the prospects for conflict over this precious resource. By 2025, experts estimated that 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions of absolute water scarcity.

Experts: 
Type of Event or Course: 

Feingold Urges DRC Reforms, Great Lakes Regional Cooperation in Remarks at USIP

Africa's Great Lakes region is ripe for progress in resolving its deadly conflicts, particularly in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), but it will take deeper regional cooperation and the DRC's full implementation of internal reforms that it has already agreed to, Russell D. Feingold, the U.S. special envoy for the Great Lakes and the DRC, said at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on February 20.

USIP Staff

Feingold, a former U.S. senator from Wisconsin who served on the Senate's Africa subcommittee for 18 years, pointed to recent developments that have helped reduce violence in the DRC. Conflict there has resulted in the death or displacement of more than five million people, making it the deadliest war in Africa's modern history. The conflict has also produced mass sexual violence, the conscription of children into armed militias and other mass humanitarian problems.

Fri, 02/21/2014 - 14:43
Type of Article: 

More International Engagement on DRC Needed, Former U.N. Special Rep Says at USIP

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), though afflicted by conflict for nearly two decades, has made limited progress on several key issues but needs continued international support and engagement to help consolidate the gains, the former special representative to the United Nations secretary general told an audience at the Institute on December 11.

USIP Staff

Roger Meece, who held the U.N. post until August, described the progress as hopeful but incomplete and in need of consistent international attention and support. “To be effective, international engagement has to be sustained and be in it for the long run,” said Meece, a retired American diplomat who earlier served as the U.S. ambassador to the DRC. “This can be done. It is achievable.”

Thu, 12/12/2013 - 15:27
Type of Article: 
Partners (HTML): 

USIP Hosts International Gathering on Water Security and Conflict Prevention

Assuring access to water of adequate quantity and quality in the face of increasing challenges poses a growing risk of future conflicts. But in preventing any outbreak of conflict, better water management can play a vital role in building peace and cooperation, a variety of officials and specialists said at the Water Security and Conflict Prevention Summit held at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on September 10.

 

USIP Staff

The summit also launched an initiative called the “Water Security and Conflict Prevention Trust” that brings together scientific, military, business, civil society, diplomatic and national security leaders for a year-long examination of issues and possible solutions to conflicts surrounding Nigeria and the Niger River basin and Pakistan and the Indus River basin. Working groups on both areas began their work this week at USIP.

Wed, 09/11/2013 - 15:16
Type of Article: 
Partners (HTML): 

USIP, Partners Release Report on Realizing ‘Responsibility to Protect’

Despite the war-weariness of Americans and political and institutional obstacles, the United States should take the global lead in fulfilling the "Responsibility to Protect," an international norm aimed at protecting civilians from genocide and mass atrocities, two senior U.S. foreign policy figures said July 23 at the release of a report issued by the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), the U.S. Holocaust Museum and the Brookings Institution. The Responsibility to Protect principle is generally known as "R2P."

Thomas Omestad

The release of "The United States and R2P: From Words to Action" took place at a symposium held at the Holocaust Museum in Washington. It reflects the deliberations of experts and practitioners convened by the three institutions.

Tue, 07/23/2013 - 16:39
Type of Article: 

Articles & Analysis

February 21, 2014
Feingold, a former U.S. senator from Wisconsin who served on the Senate's Africa subcommittee for 18 years, pointed to recent developments that have helped reduce violence in the DRC. Conflict there has resulted in the death or displacement of more than five million people, making it the deadliest war in Africa's modern history. The conflict has also produced mass sexual violence, the conscription of children into armed militias and other mass humanitarian problems.

Our Work in the Field

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Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Matthew Levinger

Examine sources of conflict as well as social and political resilience in Africa's Great Lakes region, focusing on lightly governed regions such as northern and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and northern Uganda and ways to support post-conflict recovery efforts and peacebuilding.

This two-day workshop examines sources of conflict in Africa's Great Lakes region, focusing on the challenges of stabilizing lightly governed regions such as northern and eastern Democratic Republi

Publications

Africa's Great Lakes region is ripe for progress in resolving its deadly conflicts, particularly in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), but it will take deeper regional cooperation and the DRC's full implementation of internal reforms that it has already agreed to, Russell D. Feingold, the U.S. special envoy for the Great Lakes and the DRC, said at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on February 20.
The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), though afflicted by conflict for nearly two decades, has made limited progress on several key issues but needs continued international support and engagement to help consolidate the gains, the former special representative to the United Nations secretary general told an audience at the Institute on December 11.