China

For centuries China stood as a leading civilization, outpacing the rest of the world in the arts and sciences, but in the 19th and early 20th centuries, the country was beset by civil unrest, major famines, military defeats, and foreign occupation. After World War II, the communists under Mao Zedong established an autocratic socialist system that, while ensuring China's sovereignty, imposed strict controls over everyday life and cost the lives of tens of millions of people. After 1978, Mao's successor Deng Xiaoping and other leaders focused on market-oriented economic development and by 2000 output had quadrupled. For much of the population, living standards have improved dramatically and the room for personal choice has expanded, yet political controls remain tight. Since the early 1990s, China has increased its global outreach and participation in international organizations.

U.S.-China Cooperation in Peace and Security with Ambassador Cui Tiankai

Thu, 04/10/2014 - 09:00
Thu, 04/10/2014 - 10:00

The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a timely discussion and question-and-answer session with Ambassador Cui Tiankai of the People’s Republic of China.

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel's April visit to China and President Barack Obama's Asia trip soon thereafter underscored the importance of – and some of the tensions underlying – U.S.-China relations. The conversation was continued on Twitter with #USIPChina.

Kristin Lord, Welcoming Remarks
Acting President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Stephen Hadley, Moderator
Chairman of the Board, U.S. Institute of Peace

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Keynote Address: Vice Premier Liu Yandong

Thu, 11/21/2013 - 16:30
Thu, 11/21/2013 - 17:30

Vice Premier Liu Yandong of the People’s Republic of China addresses the advancements in U.S.-China relations.

Jim Marshall, Welcoming Remarks
President, U.S. Institute of Peace

CHEN Jining, Overview of Schwarzman Scholars Program
President, Tsinghua University

Mr. Stephen Schwarzman, Introduction of Vice Premier Liu
Schwarzman Scholars and chairman and CEO of the Blackstone Group

LIU Yandong, Keynote Address
Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China

Madam Liu gave a keynote address to celebrate the advancement of bilateral relations through academic exchanges in conjunction with the annual U.S.-China Consultation on People-to-People Exchange.

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China’s Roles in the World

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 08:30
Fri, 04/25/2014 - 16:15

The U.S. Institute of Peace and the Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service invite you to join us for "China’s Roles in the World," a daylong conference designed to explore China’s growing role in the global economic, military and political realms and implications for regional security and U.S. policy. This conference will provide a more comprehensive perspective of Chinese foreign policy by evaluating the various roles China plays in the world – as rule maker, rule breaker and partner.

0830-0930: Registration

0930-0945: Welcome

  • George Lopez, Vice President of the Academy for International Confict Management and Peacebuilding, U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP)
  • Thomas Banchoff, Vice Provost for Global Engagement, Georgetown University

0945-1045: Panel One - How China Defines Itself

  • Zheng Wang, Director, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, Seton Hall University
  • Andrew Scobell, Senior Political Scientist, RAND Corporation
  • Zhu Feng, Professor, Institute of International & Strategic Studies, Peking University
  • Chair: Oriana Skylar Mastro, Assistant Professor, Georgetown University

1045-1100: Break

1100-1200: Panel Two: China as Rule Maker

  • Susan Lawrence, Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service (CRS)
  • Robert Daly, Director, Kissinger Institute on China and the United States, Wilson Center
  • Derek Scissors, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute (AEI)
  • Chair: Thomas McNaugher, Senior Visiting Professor, Georgetown Center for Security Studies

1200-1215: Break

1215-1315: Lunchtime address on China and the Wider West

  • Sir Peter Westmacott, British Ambassador to the United States
  • Moderator: Michael Green, Associate Professor, Georgetown Asian Studies Program and Senior Vice President and Japan Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

1315-1330: Break

1330-1430: Panel Three: China as Rule Breaker

  • James Mulvenon, Vice President, Defense Group, Inc (DGI)
  • Tom Mahnken, Jerome Levy Chair of Economic Geography and National Security, U.S. Naval War College
  • Abe Denmark, Vice President for Political and Security Affairs, National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR)
  • Chair: Michael Green, Associate Professor, Georgetown Asian Studies Program and Senior Vice President and Japan Chair, CSIS

1430-1445: Break

1445-1545: Panel Four: China as Partner

  • Melanie Hart, Director for Chinese Energy and Climate Policy, Center for American Progress
  • Taiya Smith, Principal Partner at Garnet Strategies, LLC
  • Phillip C. Saunders, Director, Center for the Study of Chinese Military Affairs at National Defense University's Institute for National Strategic Studies
  • Chair: Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Director of Asia-Pacific Programs, USIP

1545-1615: Concluding Remarks: U.S. Role in the Region

  • Oriana Skylar Mastro, Assistant Professor, Georgetown University
  • Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt, Director of Asia-Pacific Programs, USIP
  • David Maxwell, Associate Director, Georgetown Center for Security Studies

There are a variety of characterizations of China that suggest the need to move beyond the conventional approach of evaluating China’s role in terms of areas of just competition or cooperation. From one perspective, China has increasingly contributed to the international order, joining many international and regional organizations. China has also served as a welcomed partner in dealing with a range of regional and transnational issues, by contributing to counter-piracy in the Gulf of Aden, and other humanitarian and peacekeeping operations.

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Jeremy Moore

Jeremy
Moore
Program Specialist, Center for South & Central Asia

Jeremy D. Moore is a senior program specialist for the Center for South and Central Asia, focusing on the Afghanistan and Pakistan Priority Grant Competition that supports programs designed to promote public understanding of peaceful alternatives to the violent resolution of conflict, the rule of law, and civil society led initiatives that bridge across key religious, cultural, regional, gender, and generational divides. He joined USIP in 2010 from Bond University in Australia, where he graduated with a Masters of International Relations by Thesis degree.

Maral Noori

Maral
Noori
Program Assistant, Asia-Pacific Program

Maral Noori is a program assistant in the Asia-Pacific Program at the U.S. Institute of Peace. She works on North East Asia, the East and South China Seas, as well as Myanmar. She supports the Institute’s ongoing Track 1.5 Dialogues with partners in China, Japan, and South Korea; the Korea Working Group; the Naval Attaché Roundtable Meetings; and various additional activities and projects. Noori joined the Asia Pacific Program in October 2013.

Fallout from China’s Air Defense Zone Underscores Need for Crisis Mechanisms

Within days, the U.S., Japan and South Korea tested China’s assertion that all aircraft entering the zone would have to submit flight plans, maintain radio contact and follow directions from the Chinese Ministry of Defense or face “emergency defensive measures.” In a region where conflict risks have traditionally been more low probability and high stakes, China’s sudden announcement shortly before a planned visit by Vice President Joseph Biden significantly increased tensions and the risk of miscalculation.

Iran Agreement Sets Agenda for Talks Toward Larger Pact

The agreement delineates a plan for real, cooperative activities that achieve initial goals for each side: some of the sanctions relief sought by Iran, and Tehran’s freeze on nuclear progress sought by the P5+1 group (made up of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council – the U.S., U.K., France, Russia and China, plus Germany).

At USIP, Chinese Vice Premier Liu Urges More People-to-People Exchanges

Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong, in November 21 remarks at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) in Washington, elaborated on the reforms recently launched at a Chinese Communist Party Plenum meeting and called for the continued expansion of people-to-people exchanges as a key contribution to building a new and better type of major-power relationship between China and the United States.

Liu said China and the United States were attempting to “break the historical pattern” of conflict and confrontation when new, rising powers encounter entrenched powers. That aim was a point of broad agreement when U.S. President Barack Obama hosted a summit meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at Sunnylands, California, in June and is now a mainstay of Chinese commentary on relations with the United States.

Thomas Omestad
Fri, 11/22/2013 - 10:43
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Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt

Stephanie
Kleine-Ahlbrandt
Director, Asia-Pacific Program

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt joined the U.S. Institute of Peace as Director of the Asia-Pacific Program in August 2013.

Previously, she set up and ran the Beijing office of the International Crisis Group for five years, engaging in research, analysis and promotion of policy prescriptions on the role of China in conflict areas around the world and its relations with neighboring countries.

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China’s Subtle Strategy in the South China Sea

In a new Peace Brief, Lieutenant Commander Aaron Austin outlines China’s subtle tactics to expand its influence in the South China Sea and examines why they are so difficult to challenge.

Summary

  • Disputes over territorial and maritime claims in the South China Sea are gaining new momentum as tensions, rhetoric and conflicts increase over disputed land features in the region. China, the leading regional claimant, appears intent on securing vast swaths of ocean for its own use and control.
  • China’s subtle and imaginative tactics are successfully compelling countries in the South China Sea to back away from disputing their aggressive actions.
Fri, 07/19/2013 - 12:05
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Articles & Analysis

December 5, 2013

East Asia’s geopolitical fault lines have just become more pronounced. China’s establishment of an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) in the East China Sea on Nov. 24 has prompted protests from its neighbors. It has also more deeply ensnared the U.S. in a dispute between Japan, its longtime ally, and China, a country with which it shares vital strategic interests and wants to foster peaceful ties.

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Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Bruce MacDonald, Michael Lekson

Understand the roles of arms control and nonproliferation regimes, as well as the U.S. strategic posture, in confronting the challenges of nuclear weapons, with a special focus on the growing role of China as a regional and world power, and the dangers of North Korea’s nuclear weapons capability at a time of regime transition.

As China becomes increasingly powerful on the international stage and more assertive in East Asian and international affairs, it has been quietly growing in nuclear and strategic military power, ra

Publications

By:
Thomas Omestad
Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong, in November 21 remarks at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) in Washington, elaborated on the reforms recently launched at a Chinese Communist Party Plenum meeting and called for the continued expansion of people-to-people exchanges as a key contribution to building a new and better type of major-power relationship between China and the United States.
In a new Peace Brief, Lieutenant Commander Aaron Austin outlines China’s subtle tactics to expand its influence in the South China Sea and examines why they are so difficult to challenge.