Burundi

Burundi's first democratically elected president was assassinated in October 1993 after only 100 days in office, triggering widespread ethnic violence between Hutu and Tutsi factions. More than 200,000 Burundians perished during the conflict that spanned almost a dozen years. Hundreds of thousands of Burundians were internally displaced or became refugees in neighboring countries. An internationally brokered power-sharing agreement between the Tutsi-dominated government and the Hutu rebels in 2003 paved the way for a transition process that led to an integrated defense force, established a new constitution in 2005, and elected a majority Hutu government in 2005. The government of President Pierre Nkurunziza, who was reelected in 2010, continues to face many political and economic challenges.

Peace Prospects in the Great Lakes

Thu, 02/20/2014 - 13:00
Thu, 02/20/2014 - 14:30
Subtitle: 
A Discussion with U.S. Special Envoy Russell D. Feingold

USIP and U.S. Special Envoy Russ Feingold discussed the prospects for peace in the Great Lakes region of Africa on February 20th.

Experts: 

Africa's Great Lakes region has been a violent and unstable for years. April marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide resulted in the deaths of half a million people in 100 days. Conflict in neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo alone has displaced or killed more than 5 million residents in the past two decades, making it the deadliest war in Africa’s modern history. The region is challenged by ethnic tensions, the exploitation of resources, the continued use of child soldiers, dozens of armed rebel armed groups, and violence against women. Russ Feingold, the U.S.

Type of Event or Course: 

Feingold Urges DRC Reforms, Great Lakes Regional Cooperation in Remarks at USIP

Africa's Great Lakes region is ripe for progress in resolving its deadly conflicts, particularly in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), but it will take deeper regional cooperation and the DRC's full implementation of internal reforms that it has already agreed to, Russell D. Feingold, the U.S. special envoy for the Great Lakes and the DRC, said at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on February 20.

USIP Staff

Feingold, a former U.S. senator from Wisconsin who served on the Senate's Africa subcommittee for 18 years, pointed to recent developments that have helped reduce violence in the DRC. Conflict there has resulted in the death or displacement of more than five million people, making it the deadliest war in Africa's modern history. The conflict has also produced mass sexual violence, the conscription of children into armed militias and other mass humanitarian problems.

Fri, 02/21/2014 - 14:43
Type of Article: 

Training Peacekeepers in Burundi

The place where Burundian soldiers learn to be peacekeepers is in a remote village accessible only by dirt road, which during the rainy season turns into a river of mud. Shirtless men making red bricks pause to wave, and a few barefoot children scurry forward to watch the passing convoy of foreigners.

Angela Dickey

We arrive at our destination, a simple concrete-block training compound a few dozen kilometers outside the capital city of Bujumbura. Young Burundians practice loading and shooting AK-47s and driving armored personnel carriers—but also learn how to utilize interpreters, negotiate with clan elders and leaders of women’s organizations and mediate between groups in conflict.

Fri, 11/15/2013 - 08:55
Type of Article: 
Countries: 
Partners (HTML): 

Empowering Local Peacebuilders

Peacebuilding operations in conflict and post-conflict societies often undermine local capacity, ownership, and sustainability. The acknowledged remedy is to empower local actors to take the lead in planning and implementing programs, but few empowerment strategies that work in practice have been documented and explained.

Summary

Problem Identified

  • Peacebuilding operations in conflict and post-conflict societies often undermine local capacity, ownership, and sustainability. The acknowledged remedy is to empower local actors to take the lead in planning and implementing programs, but few empowerment strategies that work in practice have been documented and explained.

Action Taken

Wed, 03/21/2012 - 10:12
Type of Article: 

Truth Commission Digital Collection

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management.  The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management

The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

Wed, 03/16/2011 - 16:14
Type of Article: 

USIP: Teaching African Peacekeepers How to Keep the Peace

USIP trained hundreds of African peacekeepers in seven nations this year in how to negotiate and mediate the peace.

USIP is playing a vital and growing role in Africa by teaching peacekeepers negotiation and mediation skills they will use across the continent. Trainers from the Institute will have completed 17 training workshops this year as in partnership with the State Department’s African Contingency Operations Training and Assistance program, or ACOTA. African peacekeepers’ mission is to prevent the outbreak or spillover of violent conflict. But often these military officers do not receive training in how to deal with conflict at places like checkpoints and roadblocks.

Thu, 12/08/2011 - 17:38
Type of Article: 

USIP: Teaching African Peacekeepers How to Keep the Peace

USIP trained hundreds of African peacekeepers in seven nations this year in how to negotiate and mediate the peace.

USIP is playing a vital and growing role in Africa by teaching peacekeepers negotiation and mediation skills they will use across the continent. Trainers from the Institute completed 17 training workshops in 2011 as part of the State Department's African Contingency Operations Training and Assistance program, or ACOTA. African peacekeepers' mission is to prevent the outbreak or spillover of violent conflict. But often these military officers do not receive training in how to deal with conflict at places like checkpoints and roadblocks.

Tue, 07/10/2012 - 13:02
Type of Article: 

Youth in Rwanda and Burundi

This report compares the results of parallel research projects carried out among impoverished, nonelite youth in postconflict Rwanda and Burundi. Arguing that the plight and priorities of nonelite youth should be of serious national and international concern, particularly in countries that have unusually youthful populations that are overwhelmingly poor and undereducated, it finds striking differences between the groups, with a significantly bleaker picture for youth in Rwanda.

Marc Sommers and Peter Uvin

Summary

  • Extensive research with nonelite youth in postwar Rwanda and Burundi revealed stark and startling contrasts between the lives of poor Rwandan and Burundian youth, particularly concerning issues of masculinity, education, urban migration, and social mobility.
Fri, 10/14/2011 - 17:55
Type of Article: 

Negotiating Peace and Confronting Corruption

In Negotiating Peace and Confronting Corruption, Bertram Spector argues that the peace negotiation table is the best place to lay the groundwork for good governance.

Bertram I. Spector
Wed, 06/01/2011 - 14:31
Type of Article: 

Anti-Corruption Provisions are Key for Making Peace Agreements Sustainable

(Washington) –  In a new study, “Negotiating Peace and Confronting Corruption” from the United States Institute of Peace, author Bertram I. Spector argues that peace and economic recovery in countries emerging from violent conflict are more likely and more durable when good governance reforms and corruption controls are included in negotiations ending the conflict.

Wed, 07/20/2011 - 16:56
Type of Article: 

Articles & Analysis

February 21, 2014

Africa's Great Lakes region is ripe for progress in resolving its deadly conflicts, particularly in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), but it will take deeper regional cooperation and the DRC's full implementation of internal reforms that it has already agreed to, Russell D. Feingold, the U.S. special envoy for the Great Lakes and the DRC, said at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on February 20.

Our Work in the Field

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Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Matthew Levinger

Examine sources of conflict as well as social and political resilience in Africa's Great Lakes region, focusing on lightly governed regions such as northern and eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and northern Uganda and ways to support post-conflict recovery efforts and peacebuilding.

This two-day workshop examines sources of conflict in Africa's Great Lakes region, focusing on the challenges of stabilizing lightly governed regions such as northern and eastern Democratic Republi

Publications

Africa's Great Lakes region is ripe for progress in resolving its deadly conflicts, particularly in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), but it will take deeper regional cooperation and the DRC's full implementation of internal reforms that it has already agreed to, Russell D. Feingold, the U.S. special envoy for the Great Lakes and the DRC, said at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on February 20.
By:
Angela Dickey
The place where Burundian soldiers learn to be peacekeepers is in a remote village accessible only by dirt road, which during the rainy season turns into a river of mud. Shirtless men making red bricks pause to wave, and a few barefoot children scurry forward to watch the passing convoy of foreigners.