Algeria

After more than a century of rule by France, Algerians fought through much of the 1950s to achieve independence in 1962. Algeria's primary political party, the National Liberation Front (FLN), was established in 1954 as part of the struggle for independence and has largely dominated politics since. Abdelaziz Bouteflika, with the backing of the military, won the presidency in 1999 in an election widely viewed as fraudulent. He was reelected to a second term in 2004 and overwhelmingly won a third term in 2009, after the government amended the constitution in 2008 to remove presidential term limits. Longstanding problems continue to face Bouteflika. The Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat (GSPC) in 2006 merged with al Qaeda to form al Qaeda in the Lands of the Islamic Maghreb, which has launched an ongoing series of kidnappings and bombings targeting the Algerian Government. The government in 2011 introduced political reforms in response to the Arab Spring, including lifting the 19-year-old state of emergency restrictions and increasing women's quotas for elected assemblies. Political protest activity in the country remained low in 2012, but small, sometimes violent socioeconomic demonstrations by disparate groups continued to be a common occurrence.

Effective Foreign Assistance and National Security: A View from Congressman Adam Smith

Fri, 07/19/2013 - 09:00
Fri, 07/19/2013 - 10:30
Subtitle: 
A USIP Congressional Newsmaker Series Event

Congressman Adam Smith (D-WA), ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee, offered his views on how foreign assistance preserves and promotes the country’s national security.

Drawing from his extensive experience assessing U.S. military capabilities, strengths and needs, Congressman Smith spoke about the importance of strengthening American diplomacy and development capabilities, as well as defense.

Type of Event or Course: 

Al-Qaida on the Rise in North Africa?

USIP’s Dan Brumberg considers the potential for al-Qaida’s growth in North Africa, and the challenge this poses to U.S. relationships with the new, post-conflict governments in the region.

How do you assess the regional implications of the January 16 seizure by radical Islamists of a gas field along the border area of Algeria and Libya—as well as the resulting (and horrific) casualties? And what are the implications for the “Arab Spring” uprisings, which are now in their third season?

Wed, 02/13/2013 - 14:01
Type of Article: 

Regional Security Lessons from the Attack on Algeria's In Amenas Gas Plant

This month’s attack on the In Amenas gas refinery and housing complex in southeastern Algeria raises questions beyond the nature, timing and implications of the Algerian government’s response. The incident highlights our need to understand the vulnerability of energy infrastructure as a magnet for attacks in violence-prone regions, as well as the motivations and modus operandi of militant groups in the 21st Century.

Democratic Breakthroughs: The Ingredients of Successful Revolts

Although each revolution is different, each successful case of democratic breakthrough shares common domestic and international influences. This report examines 11 cases of past successes at removing autocratic regimes and establishing elections. It then applies its findings to the emerging revolutions of the Arab Spring.

Ray Salvatore Jennings

Summary

  • The cases of successful breakthrough examined in this study are the Soviet Union in 1991 and Russia in 1993, Poland in 1989, Serbia in 2000, Ukraine in 2004, Indonesia by 1999, Chile in 1988, and South Africa by 1996. Cases of failed and then ultimately successful democratic transition are Ghana by 2000, Mexico by 2000, South Korea by 1987, and Turkey by 1983. Finally, the cases of failed transition examined are Algeria in 1991, Iran in 1979, China in 1989, and Azerbaijan in 2005.
Fri, 07/27/2012 - 10:03
Type of Article: 

Joyce A. Kasee

Joyce
Kasee
Program Officer, Middle East & Africa

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Joyce A. Kasee is a program officer for the Middle East & Africa team, who joined USIP in 2009. Kasee currently serves as a member of USIP’s Iraq and North Africa programs. From 2010 to 2012, she worked in Iraq, including serving as country representative in Iraq, and managing USIP's Baghdad office.

Role: 

The Islamists Are Coming

The Islamists Are Coming is the first book to survey the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab Spring. In this book, Robin Wright offers an overview and 10 experts identify Islamists in Algeria, Egypt (two), Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, the Palestinian territories, Syria, and Tunisia. Each chapter is designed to help both a general audience and specialists.

Robin Wright

A new book published by the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, The Islamists are Coming: Who They Really Are, was launched April 18 at an event at the Wilson Center in Washington. USIP senior fellow Robin Wright edited and wrote an overview chapter for the volume, which assesses the politics, intentions and capabilities of the many Islamist parties with millions of followers that have gained greater prominence since the uprisings of the Arab Spring.

Thu, 04/19/2012 - 08:15
Type of Article: 

Truth Commission Digital Collection

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management.  The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

The United States Institute of Peace’s Truth Commissions Digital Collection is part of the Margarita S. Studemeister Digital Library in International Conflict Management

The collection contains profiles of truth commissions and substantive bodies of inquiry from nations worldwide - offering general background information on the composition of each body, links to the official legislative texts establishing such commissions, and each commission's final reports and findings.

Wed, 03/16/2011 - 16:14
Type of Article: 

Querine Hanlon

Querine
Hanlon
Special Advisor, North Africa

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Dr. Querine Hanlon is special advisor to the Center for Middle East and Africa at USIP. She currently leads projects on Tunisia, Middle East and North Africa security and justice sector reform and North Africa border security. Additionally, Hanlon works on violent extremism, armed groups, and security sector reform. Hanlon is conducting a major research project focused on designing a blueprint for security sector reform for the 21st century with Dr. Richard Shultz of the Fletcher School.

Articles & Analysis

September 23, 2013

A new report from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars illuminates the connections between conflict and food insecurity admirably, even as it recognizes that considerable work remains to be done on how food-related problems actually promote or alter conflict.

January 25, 2013
By:
USIP Staff
January 23, 2013
By:
Raymond Gilpin, Jennifer Giroux, Fatima Kyari Mohammed and Shadé Brown
By:
Steven Heydemann

Our Work in the Field

Learn More

Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Debra Liang-Fenton, Linda Bishai, Dorina Bekoe, Jacqueline H. Wilson

This course will be offered again in the Fall of 2014

Stemming electoral violence in transition and fragile environments requires understanding the broader landscape of the conflict and how that conflict is managed. With important elections in Africa on the horizon in 2014 and 2015, this course will examine specific examples from cases across Africa in order to analyze how electoral violence was prevented or mitigated through effective strategic planning and policymaking.

"The popular U.S.

Publications

USIP’s Dan Brumberg considers the potential for al-Qaida’s growth in North Africa, and the challenge this poses to U.S. relationships with the new, post-conflict governments in the region.
By:
Ray Salvatore Jennings
Although each revolution is different, each successful case of democratic breakthrough shares common domestic and international influences. This report examines 11 cases of past successes at removing autocratic regimes and establishing elections. It then applies its findings to the emerging revolutions of the Arab Spring.